What is a “Songbook standard”?


Songbook champagne header 1a

The following page, published on 17 March, was substantially revised and expanded on 21-22 March (latest revision, 2 July 2017):

See also the relevant comment exchange between Robert Silvestri and myself at the bottom of the page.


Songbook site index



Billie Holiday, probably at Pep's Musical Bar, 25-30 April 1955 (2)1890-1969 selected standards and hits pages
Galleries: performing artist and songwriter
Galleries: film
Songwriters to 1954
Songwriters, 1955-1975
Complete page index
Film Musicals and Revues: selected films and songs, 1929-47
Performing Artist features
Jazz Age
Swing Eras 1 and 2
about the site + selected notes



Page index (drop-down) browse demo (1a)

(above) header tab 5 generation browse demonstration: Page Index > Songbook site index > Songwriter > Songwriters to 1954 > Berlin, Irving > Berlin pages (11) — correction: The page Irving Berlin: selected songs of 1909 and 1910 is now included in the Berlin drop down index.


Stirring to sing love’s magic music


Today I published a page on the song “Some Other Spring.” The songs, with music by Irene Kitchings and words by Arthur Herzog, Jr., was registered for copyright in 1939. The first recording seems to have been that by Billie Holiday and her Orchestra, during a session on Wednesday, 5 July 1939. The song is primarily known and performed as a jazz standard. The new page is here:

Some Other Spring

lyric: Poetry Countdown, Billie Holiday Songs, International Lyrics Playground

recordings included in the page:

  • Billie Holiday and her Orchestra — recorded on 5 July 1939; issued on the 78 rpm single Vocalion 5021 (1),(2),(3), c/w “Them There Eyes”


  • Teddy Wilson and his Orchestra, vocal: Jean Eldridge — recorded in NYC on 12 September 1939 (1), (2); issued on the single Columbia 35298, c/w “Hallelujah!”
  • Austin Powell Quintet — recorded on 26 February 1951; issued in April 1951 on the 45 rpm single Decca 9-48206, b/w “All This Can’t Be True” — and on the 78 rpm single Decca 48206
  • Benny Carter Quintet with Joe Glover Orchestra — recorded at Reeves Sound Studios, NYC, 18 September 1952; originally released on the 10-inch 1954 Benny Carter album The Formidable Benny Carter, Norgran Records MGN-21; later released on the 1956 album Alone Together, Norgran Records MGN 1058, which was credited on the album to “Benny Carter And His Strings With The Oscar Peterson Quartet”
  • Jimmy Raney Quartet — recorded at Van Gelder Studios, New York, 28 May 1954; originally released on the 1954 10-inch LP Jimmy Raney Quartet, New Jazz NJLP 1101, which was released in the UK as The Quartet Plays — The four tracks on the 1954 EP were later included as the first four tracks on the LP album A, Prestige PRLP 7089, released in 1957, according to RateYourMusic.com (see link below). “A” album info: JazzDisco.org, RateYourMusic.com, Discogs.com.
  • Art Tatum Trio — recorded in Los Angeles on 27 January 1956; released on the 1957 album Presenting…The Art Tatum Trio, (US) Verve Records MGV-8118



  • Carmen McRae — from her 1962 album Sings Lover Man And Other Billie Holiday Classics, (US) Columbia CL 1730, which was released on the Philips label in the UK
  • Karin Krog & Dexter Gordon — from the 1970 LP Some Other Spring, Blues and Ballads, (Norway) Sonet SLPS 1407, (Japan) Sonet UPS-2021-N
  • Tommy Flanagan TrioMedley: Some Other Spring / Easy Living — live, 13 July 1977 at the Montreux Jazz Festival; audio released on the 1977 album Montreux ’77, (US) Pablo 2308-202 (I haven’t identified the source of the video footage.) — Tommy Flanagan – piano, Keter Betts – bass, Bobby Durham – drums


High on a hilltop, love is calling


Tonight (Tuesday) I published a page on another jazz standard with a spring theme. The new page is here:

Suddenly It’s Spring


Suddenly It’s Spring (m. Jimmy Van Heusen, w. Johnny Burke)

The song was registered for copyright on 7 December 1943. It was recorded by Ginger Rogers and Don Loper — according to IMDb, SecondHandSongs, and others — for the 1944 feature film Lady in the Dark, though it was cut from the film. A post on the song at The Ginger Rogers Resource says:

Miss Ginger Rogers recorded the song “Suddenly It’s Spring” for the movie Lady in the Dark. When the movie was released in 1944, the song had been left on the cutting room floor BUT the recording was put on a record…

However, the link provided there to a Rogers recording at archive.org is dead, and I’ve been unable to locate the recording elsewhere.


A chronological list of recordings of the song included in the page:

  • Hildegarde — recorded on 4 January 1944; issued on the 78 rpm single Decca 23297, b/w “Leave Us Face It (We’re In Love)”
  • Ginny Simms — recorded on 28 January 1944; issued on the single Columbia 36693, b/w “Irresistible You”
  • Glenn Miller and the Army Air Force Band , vocal: Johnny Desmond — recorded on 19 February 1944; available on the album The Missing Chapters – Volume 1: American Patrol (2007)
  • Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra, vocal: Eugenie Baird — recorded on 28 February 1944; issued on the 78 rpm single Decca 18596, b/w “Sure Thing” (Jerome Kern, Ira Gershwin)
  • Jerry Cooper with orchestra directed by Wilbur Hatch — evidently a radio broadcast transcription — The provider says, “from June 1, 1944 Spotlight On Music” and “orchestra directed by Wilbur Hatch.”
  • Frank Sinatra – I haven’t been able to date or locate this recording. My guess would be mid- to late 1940s. The audience applause at the beginning suggests that it’s from a live show, though that could be canned. Steve Albin’s extensive list of songs recorded by Sinatra doesn’t include “Suddenly It’s Spring.” The quality of the recording is low.



  • The Fabulous Five — from the 1966 album Lara’s Theme, Power Records D406 (Mono), DS 406 (Stereo)
  • Joe Albany — from the 1972 album Proto-Bopper, released on Revelation Records in the US and Spotlite Records in the UK
  • Zoot Sims Quartet— recorded on 26 May 1983 in New York City; from the 1983 LP Suddenly It’s Spring, Pablo Records 2310-898
  • Fraser MacPherson Quartet — from the 1987 album Honey and Spice, Justin Time JUST-23-1


March Winds and April Showers


March Winds and April Showers (Walter G. Samuels, Leonard Whitcup, Teddy Powell)

chorus lyric: adapted from a transcription posted by Auld_Carl_Hood, in the thread Poem about months of the year, at The AnswerBank*

March winds and April showers
Make way for sweet May flowers
And then comes June, the moon, and you

March winds and April showers
Romance will soon be ours
An outdoor paradise for two

With your lips to mine
In a thrill divine
I’ll be so inspired
That I’ll get you the Moon for a toy balloon

March winds and April showers
Make way for happy hours
And May time, June time, love time, and you

Victor Young and his Orchestra, vocal: Jimmie Ray — recorded on 7 February 1935; issued on the 78 rpm single Decca 378, b/w “When Love Knocks at Your Heart” (m. Peter de Rose, w. Billy Hill)


Ruth Etting — recorded on 11 February 1935; issued on Columbia 3014D, as the B-side of “Things Might Have Been So Different” (m. J. Fred Coots, w. Sam M. Lewis)


Abe Lyman and his California Orchestra, vocal: Louis Rapp — recorded on 12 February 1935; issued on Brunswick 7389, b/w “I’m Misunderstood”



Before the rising sun, we fly


Today I published a second page on the song “We’ve Only Just Begun,” featuring a couple of dozen recordings that were omitted from my original page. The original page, published on 23 June 2014, is here: We’ve Only Just Begun. The sequel is not a chronological extension of the first page. Instead, as I did with the first page, I’ve selected the included recordings from among those released since 1970.

Here’s a link to the new page: We’ve Only Just Begun — part 2


We’ve Only Just Begun (m. Roger Nichols, w. Paul Williams)


lyric (Carpenter’s version):


Recordings included in the new page:

  • Dionne Warwick — from the album Very Dionne, (US) Scepter SPS 587, released in December 1970
  • Billy Eckstine — from his 1971 LP Feel the Warm, (UK) Stax 2362-019, (US) Enterprise ENS-1017
  • Nora Aunor — from the 1971 album The Song of My Life, (Philippines) Alpha Records LPM-036
  • The Don Tweedy Chorus and Orchestra — from their 1971 self-titled album on Ovation Records
  • The Alan Tew Orchestra — from the 1971 album These I Like, (UK, US) CBS 64424
  • The Moments — from the 1972 album Live at the Miss Black America Pageant, Stang Records ST-1015
  • The Temprees — originally included on their 1972 LP Lovemen, We Produce Records XPS-1901
  • Peter Nero — from his 1972 album Summer of ’42, (US) Columbia C-31105
  • O’Donel Levy — originally released on his 1972 LP Breeding of Mind, Groove Merchant GM 507
  • Jack Jones — from his 1973 album Together, (UK) RCA Victor SF 8342, (US) RCA Victor APL1-0139
  • George Jackson — issued in November 1973 on the single MGM Records K-14680, b/w “You Can’t Run Away from Love”
  • Warren “Donnell” Hickman and The San Francisco Inspirational Choir, featuring soloist: David Gardner — from the 1974 LP He Didn’t Have to Do It, Jewel Records LPS 0093
  • Leslie Butler Plus 3 — from the 1975 album We’ve Only Just Begun, (Jamaica) Federal Records FRM 134
  • Phil Woods / Michel Legrand and Orchestra — from the 1975 album Images, RCA Victor BGL1-1027
  • Bobby Womack & Brotherhood, featuring a vocal duet with Peggy Young — from the 1976 album Home is Where the Heart Is, (US) Columbia PC 34384
  • Bing Crosby with Pete Moore and his Orchestra — recorded on 29 October 1976 at Hollywood, CA, and included on the 1977 album Beautiful Memories, United Artists Records UAS 30116 — It was the penultimate Bing Crosby album completed before his death on 14 October 1977.
  • Lynn Anderson —  from her the 1982 compilation album The Best Of Lynn Anderson – Memories And Desires, ERA Records NU 5230 — I believe this recording was previously unreleased.
  • Salena Jones — from her 2001 album Those Eyes

recent piano solo

recent choir

  • Elementary school children’s choir — Spring Concert, 2009; unidentified school and location, evidently in the Brownsville, TX area
  • Ocean City High School Choir — Spring Concert, 2010
  • Glad Community Choir — Glasgow, Scotland; published on 10 June 2017

time washes clean, love’s wounds unseen


It’s been a while since I published a new page, almost ten months! I hadn’t planned to keep you waiting that long, but the path that your life will take is not always easy to foresee. Anyway, it’s been a long time. Hope you enjoy this one.

This is a post announcing the new page. Here’s a link to the page:

Long Long Time (Gary White) — first recorded by Linda Ronstadt and issued on the 1970 album Silk Purse

In an undated interview with David Bromberg conducted by the Huffington Post, promoting the release of Bromberg’s 2011 album Use Me, according to a transcription provided at DavidBromberg.net, the artist said:

Well, Linda [Ronstadt] and I have been friends for a very long time. I think she may give me more credit than I deserve. For instance, one night, we were together in The Village in New York, and she had just had a hit with the song “Different Drum” but nothing else seemed to catch. So, I brought her back to the apartment I was living in, into my friend Gary White’s room, and I called Paul Siebel and had him come up as well. Gary and Paul sang Linda songs all night. When she left, she shared a cab with Jerry Scheff who suggested she listen to The McGarrigle Sisters’ “Heart Like A Wheel,” but that song came much later. Her next recording was a collection of Gary White and Paul Siebel tunes*, and she had a hit with Gary White’s “Long, Long Time,” which was the hit that revived her career.

Recordings included in the page:

Linda Rondstadt recording and early television performances

  • Linda Ronstadt — from her album Silk Purse, (US) Capitol Records ST-407, released in March 1970; also issued in June 1970 on the single Capitol 2846, b/w “Nobodys” (Gary White) — Although the title of the song is sometimes given as “Long, Long Time,” with a comma, the Silk Purse album track and the subsequent single were each titled “Long Long Time,” so I’m going with this spelling.
  • Linda Ronstadt — live performance recorded for television series Playboy After Dark, Season 2, Episode 21, taped on 16 April 1970**; original broadcast date unknown
  • Linda Ronstadt — from The Johnny Cash Show, Episode 2.4, airdate: 14 October 1970
  • Linda Ronstadt with Bobby Darin (on acoustic guitar) — from the television special The Darin Invasion, taped in October 1970 but broadcast in October 1971, according to a page on the Linda Ronstadt Forum that features an extensive list of television appearances by Ronstadt in the 1970s
  • Linda Ronstadt — from television series The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour, Season 3, Episode 16; airdate: 10 January 1971
  • Linda Ronstadt — live television studio performance for the series The Midnight Special, Season 1, Episode 1 (pilot episode); airdate: 19 August 1972


selected recordings by other artists

  • Claudine Longet — issued in October 1970 on the single Barnaby ZS7 2022, as the B-side of “Broomstick Cowboy” — The recording was also included on her 1971 album We’ve Only Just Begun, (US) Barnaby Z 30377
  • Gene Ammons — from the 1970 album The Black Cat! (Prestige)
  • Harry Belafonte and Eloise Laws (duet) — from the 1973 Harry Belafonte album Play Me, (US, Canada) RCA Victor APL1-0094
  • Jody Miller — from her 1974 album House of the Rising Sun, (US, Canada) Epic ‎KE 32569
  • Larry Santos — from his 1975 album Larry Santos, (US) Casablanca NBLP 7018; in October 1976 it was issued on the single Casablanca NB 869, b/w “You Are Everything I Need” (Santos)
  • Lynn Anderson — from her 1976 album All the King’s Horses, (US) Columbia KC 34089
  • Tracy Huang — from her 1977 LP Portrait, (Singapore)‎ EMI EMGS 5042
  • Melanie Safka — from her self-released 1996 album Unchained Melanie
  • Smiffenpoofs — from the 1999 CD album Twelve
  • Babs — published on YouTube on 17 Jul 12012
  • Bryce Hitchcock — published 7 March 2014


* This is an inaccurate description of Silk Purse, which has among its ten tracks two songs written by Gary White and one by Paul Siebel. Perhaps other songs by these two were recorded during the sessions but not included on the album.

** I’ve used either tv.com or Internet Movie Database (IMDb) in identifying the season and episode, and (when available) both the taping date and broadcast date for each of the television show performances included on this page. However, a single page on the Linda Ronstadt Forum features an extensive list of 1970s television appearances by Ronstadt that provides more or less the same information.

summer break



Greetings to all my visitors, new and old. The purpose of this message is to announce that I have decided to take a break from creating and posting new work on the site until at least mid-September. Will post an update should my plans change in the interim. During the break, I might allow the maintenance to slip a bit more than usual, so that visitors may find a few more deleted videos than normal on the site. Will try to keep it looking presentable. Also, I will continue to respond promptly to comments.

Hope you all enjoy the summer. Best wishes.

Regards, doc

Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me


Bobby Troup and Julie London-4Bobby Troup and Julie London-5

(above) Bobby Troup and Julie London — source: JulieLondon.org

Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me (Bobby Troup) — date published unknown

I’m aware of only the few recordings of the song included below, by Teri Thornton, Julie London, Bobby Troup, and Marilyn Maye. I’ve often wondered why the song did not become well-known and often covered. Perhaps the triple rhymes and off-rhymes —  “Yesterday” / “here’s today,” “cold again” / “fold again,” “be content” / “be so bent,” “serener place” / “greener place,” etc. — were thought to be outdated or artificial. Such constructions may have been considered passé long before Troup published this song. Among American popular song lyricists of the 20th century, triple rhymes are most closely associated with Lorenz Hart.

On the day before creating and publishing this post, I noticed that someone had entered the site via a keyword search looking for the lyric to “Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me.” I didn’t have it. In fact, I’d been periodically looking for the lyric for the previous four or five years. So, after another round of searches came up empty I decided to transcribe it. The following transcription is drawn from the taped live performance by Bobby Troup and (presumably) his band for the 1965 Julie London TV variety special, Julie: Something Special.

Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me — words and music by Bobby Troup

Yesterday, things looked bright
I never knew a kiss so right
But here’s today — I’m out in the cold again
Just like a sheep that’s lost from his fold again
Won’t someone please belong to me

Find my love, mind my love
Try not to be unkind, my love
Just be content — there is no serener place
Don’t be so bent in finding a greener place
Won’t someone please belong to me

A fool am I
You’d think someday I’d learn
For fools like I
The tables never turn
But I’m not wise
I’m always taken by surprise, surprise

Days are long
Nights are long
Time seems so slow when things go wrong
Won’t someone new come here and be mad to be
Near someone who is true and so glad to be
Won’t someone please, please, please belong to me
Please belong to me
Please belong to me

transcribed by Jim “doc” Radcliff on 10 March 2015 *


1965 Won't Someone Please Belong to Me (Troup)-Teri Thornton Columbia 4-43209 (B-side)

Teri Thornton — B-side of the 45 rpm single “To Remember You By,” Columbia 4-43209, issued on 25 January 1965

Note: Despite each of the following two videos purporting to contain a copy of the B-side of Columbia 4-43209, though the second contains an image which suggests that it might be from a promotional copy of the single, they aren’t even close to being the same length, one being several seconds shorter than the 2:25 stated on the label and the other several seconds longer. The recording in video 1 is about 2:20 in length, while that in video 2 is about 2:32, though they do sound like the same recording. I surmise that at some point perhaps either the shorter one was slightly sped up, the longer one slowed down, or both.

video 1


video 2


Bobby Troup with unidentified small combo — live, from the Julie London TV variety special Julie: Something Special, air date: 17 November 1965

JulieLondon.org says,

On November 17th, 1965 WGN-TV in Chicago aired an hour-long special titled Julie: Something Special. Julie sings many of her popular numbers and is joined by, now husband, Bobby Troup and the quartet, The Hi-Lo’s. All of their performances are included. This show was re-aired on NBC-TV on February 13th, 1967.

It must have been the rebroadcast on NBC which I saw as a child of nine, for I recalled this performance decades later when I came across the video several years ago.


1965 Feeling Good-Julie London (LP) Liberty LST-7416

Julie London — from the 1965 LP Feeling Good: with the Gerald Wilson Big Band, LRP-3416 (Mono), LST-7416 Stereo


The Second of Maye, Marilyn Maye, (US) RCA Victor LSP-3546, released in 1966

Marilyn Maye — from the live album The Second of Maye, (US) RCA Victor LSP-3546, released in 1966 [Thanks to visitor Helen, whose helpful comment made me aware of this recording.]

From marilynmaye.com:

This album marked the second collaboration of Marilyn and Joe Rene. It was recorded live at The Living Room, a then-famous New York nightclub, and released in 1966. Joining Marilyn was The Sammy Tucker Quintet featuring Sammy Tucker, her husband at the time, on the piano. The album notes were penned by Skitch Henderson, then-musical director for The Tonight Show.


* “Days” and “Nights” are reversed in the first two lines of the final section in the versions by Teri Thornton, Julie London, and Marilyn Maye. The line “Won’t someone new come here and be mad to be” is slightly different in the Thornton and London versions, the first word being “Please” instead of “Won’t,” and “glad” replacing “mad.” However, the second line of the section is identical to the Troup version in the London recording (she sings “glad” in both lines, twice), yet very different in the Thornton recording, which goes “Near someone true, as true as you’ll ever be.” The lyric sung by Marilyn Maye in her live version also displays other minor differences from each of the others. She replaces the word “sheep” with “lamb,” and modifies the expression “Don’t be so bent in,” to the more prevalent “Don’t be so bent on.”

For other lyric transcriptions by yours truly see the page Unsung lyrics, transcribed by doc.

Pour toi / Feelings / Sentimientos / Dis-lui

1975 Feelings-Morris Albert (LP) RCA Victor APL1-1018 (back)-d30Selected links



Morris Albert’s 1973 recording of “Feelings” was a big hit in 1974. The song was adapted, according to a 1987 jury verdict in Federal District Court in Manhattan, by Albert from the song “Pour toi,” composed in 1956 by Louis Gasté, with lyrics by Albert Simonin and his wife Marie-Hélène Bourquin, though it took a lengthy and eventually successful 1980s copyright infringement suit to legally name Gasté as co-songwriter. Albert also released an alternate version with a Spanish-language lyric, in 1974, which was evidently written by himself, as he’s the sole songwriter credited on the label (see below). In 1975, Israeli-born French pop star Mike Brant recorded a version of “Feelings” titled “Dis-lui” (“Tell him”), with the French lyric written by Michel Jourdan.

Line Renaud and Loulou Gasté (1)Line Renaud (1)

Pour toi (m. Louis Gasté, w. Albert Simonin, Marie-Hélène Bourquin)
“Pour toi” was recorded by the singer and actress Line Renaud, wife of Gasté, in 1956, and performed by Dario Moreno in the 1957 film Le Feu aux poudres. The arrangements of the song used by Moreno in the film and in a separate studio recording with an orchestra sound very little like Morris Albert’s 1973 recording of “Feelings,” though portions of the melody are similar. The 1956 recording by Line Renaud, in part, exhibits slightly greater resemblance to Albert’s “Feelings,” melodically and in tone, but it seems like a rather large leap to find that the melody of “Feelings” was copied or stolen from the French song.

The claim made by the plaintiff Gasté that Albert “gained access” to the virtually unknown song “Pour toi” through his publisher Fermata, which “had had some dealings with Gasté’s publishing company, Les Editions Louis Gasté, in the 1950s” was unaccompanied by evidence that such access was ever obtained.

Line Renaud — title song from the 1956 EP Pathé ‎(France) 45 EG 232


Dario Moreno — in the 1956 film Le Feu aux poudres; the performance begins at about :49


1957 Imploration (EP) Dario Moreno- Philips 432.182 NE

Dario Moreno — from the 1957 EP Imploration, Philips 432.182 NE


1975 Feelings-Morris Albert (LP) RCA Victor APL1-1018-d20

Feelings (m. Louis Gasté, Morris Albert, w. Morris Albert)

Morris Albert

Feelings — issued in 1974 on the single RCA Victor PB-10279, b/w “This World Today is a Mess” — US chart success: #6, Hot 100; #2, Adult Contemporary; also later released on the 1975 LP Feelings, RCA Victor ‎APL1-1018


1974 Sentimientos-Morris Albert-(Brazil) Beverly 45-13.508

Sentimientos (aka “Dime”) — issued in 1974 on Beverly ‎(Brazil) 45-13.508; songwriting credited solely to Morris Albert on the label — A recording under the same title released by Mexican singer José José in 1974 has a different lyric.


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