Songbook site index

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1890-1969 selected standards and hits pages
Galleries: performing artist and songwriter
Galleries: film
Songwriters to 1954
Songwriters, 1955-1973
Complete page index
Film Musicals and Revues: selected films and songs, 1929-47
Performing Artist features
Jazz Age
Swing Eras 1 and 2
about the site + selected notes
Friends
Acknowledgments

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Billie Holiday, capebillie-holiday-pearls-1a

Page index (drop-down) browse demo (1a)

(above) header tab 5 generation browse demonstration: Page Index > Songbook site index > Songwriter > Songwriters to 1954 > Berlin, Irving > Berlin pages (11) — correction: The page Irving Berlin: selected songs of 1909 and 1910 is now included in the Berlin drop down index.

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Under a Texas Moon: selected early recordings, 1929-1930

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Under a Texas Moon (1930) poster 1-c2(p130)

Under a Texas Moon (Ray Perkins) — The song was featured in the soundtrack of the 1930 film of the same title. It’s unclear whether the song was written for the film, as it was first recorded in November 1929, over four months before the film’s 1 April 1930 release, and recorded at least ten times prior to the release of the film. It’s true that most of the labels I’ve seen of recordings made before the first of April 1930 refer to the film, but this may be due to later pressings by record companies trying to capitalize on the film’s publicity.

Of the film, Wikipedia says:

It was the second all-color all-talking feature to be filmed entirely outdoors as well as being the second western in color and the first all-talking all-color western.

Ted Fio Rito-1Ted Fio Rito 1a

Ted Fiorito and his Orchestra, vocal: Pedro Espino — recorded on 21 November 1929 in Chicago; issued on Victor 22252, b/w “I’d Like to Be a Gypsy”

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Bob Haring and his Orchestra — recorded in December 1929, and issued on Brunswick 4680, c/w “Gypsy Dream Rose,” recorded by the A&P Gypsies (Harry Horlick) — The video below displays the label of a Spanish Brunswick release, under the title “Bajo la luna de Texas,” with a not quite legible catalog number.

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Hal Kemp (1)Hal Kemp (2a)

Hal Kemp and his Carolina Club Orchestra — recorded on 27 December 1929, and issued on OKeh 41360, c/w “I’m Following You,” recorded by Arthur Schutt and his Orchestra — The Kemp recording was also issued on Parlophone 34027, c/w “Rockin’ Chair,” recorded by Louis Armstrong and his Orchestra

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Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians, vocal: Carmen Lombardo? — recorded on 27 December 1929; issued on Columbia 2089-D, c/w “Can’t You Understand”

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Bert Lown and his Loungers — recorded on 8 January 1930; issued on Harmony 1088-H, c/w “Do You Love Me,” recorded by Rudy Marlow and his Orchestra

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Seger Ellis (1a)Eddie Lang performs with Gibson guitar, c.1928 in Chicago, Illinois

Seger Ellis and the Tampa Blue Trio (featuring Eddie Lang on guitar) — recorded on 13 January 1930; issued on OKeh 41396; c/w “Should I?” — also issued on Odeon (US) 36066

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Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me

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Bobby Troup and Julie London-4Bobby Troup and Julie London-5

(above) Bobby Troup and Julie London — source: JulieLondon.org

Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me (Bobby Troup)

Date published unknown. I’m aware of only four recordings, and have heard only three, Teri Thornton’s 1963 release being the first, chronologically, followed by 1965 recordings by Bobby Troup and Julie London. Cabaret singer Marilyn Maye evidently also released a recording of the song, on her 1966 album The Second of Maye. Each time I hear Thornton’s or Troup’s versions I wonder why the song is not well known and often covered. Perhaps the triple rhymes and off-rhymes —  “Yesterday” / “here’s today,” “cold again” / “fold again,” “serener place” / “greener place,” etc. — were thought to be outdated or artificial. Such constructions may have been considered passé long before Troup published this song. Among American popular song lyricists of the 20th century, triple rhymes are most closely associated with Lorenz Hart.

I noticed yesterday that someone had entered the site via a keyword search for the the lyric to “Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me.” I didn’t have it. In fact, I’ve been periodically looking for the lyric for the past four or five years. So, after another round of searches came up empty I decided to transcribe it. The following transcription is drawn from the taped live performance by Bobby Troup and (presumably) his band for the 1965 Julie London TV variety special, Julie: Something Special.

Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me — words and music by Bobby Troup

Yesterday, things looked bright
I never knew a kiss so right
But here’s today — I’m out in the cold again
Just like a sheep that’s lost from his fold again
Won’t someone please belong to me

Find my love, mind my love
Try not to be unkind, my love
Just be content — there is no serener place
Don’t be so bent in finding a greener place
Won’t someone please belong to me

A fool am I
You’d think someday I’d learn
For fools like I
The tables never turn
But I’m not wise
I’m always taken by surprise, surprise

Days are long *
Nights are long
Time seems so slow when things go wrong
Won’t someone new come here and be mad to be
Near someone who is true and so glad to be
Won’t someone please, please, please belong to me
Please belong to me
Please belong to me

transcribed by Jim “doc” Radcliff on 10 March 2015 **

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1963-Theri Thorntion Sings Open Highway-LP-Columbia Records CS 88941965 Won't Someone Please Belong to Me (Troup)-Teri Thornton Columbia 4-43209 (B-side)

Teri Thornton — B-side of the 45 rpm single “To Remember You By,” Columbia 4-43209, issued on 25 January 1965; previously released on the 1963 album Teri Thornton Sings Open Highway, Columbia Records CS 8894

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Bobby Troup with unidentified small combo — live, from the Julie London TV variety special Julie: Something Special, air date: 17 November 1965

JulieLondon.org says,

On November 17th, 1965 WGN-TV in Chicago aired an hour-long special titled Julie: Something Special. Julie sings many of her popular numbers and is joined by, now husband, Bobby Troup and the quartet, The Hi-Lo’s. All of their performances are included. This show was re-aired on NBC-TV on February 13th, 1967.

It must have been the rebroadcast on NBC which I saw as a child of nine, for I recalled this performance decades later when I came across the video several years ago.

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1965 Feeling Good-Julie London (LP) Liberty LST-7416

Julie London — from the 1965 LP Feeling Good: with the Gerald Wilson Big Band, LRP-3416 (Mono), LST-7416 Stereo

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* “Days” and “Nights” are reversed in the first two lines of the final section in the versions by Teri Thornton and Julie London. The line “Won’t someone new come here and be mad to be” is slightly different in the Thornton and London versions, the first word being “Please” instead of “Won’t,” and “glad” replacing “mad” in the Thornton version. However, the line which follows it is identical in the London version, yet very different in the Thornton recording: “Near someone true, as true as you’ll ever be.”

** For other lyric transcriptions by yours truly see: Unsung lyrics, transcribed by doc

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Deep Purple: selected early recordings, 1934 and 1938-39

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Deep Purple (m. Peter De Rose, w. Mitchell Parish) — According to various sources, the music was published as a piano composition in 1933, but it was evidently registered for copyright on 7 June 1934 as an unpublished work. Mitchell Parish later wrote a lyric which was first recorded in 1938.

Selected links, song:1934 Deep Purple (Peter De Rose) Paul Whiteman-Victor 36131-B

Songwriters:

From Wikipedia:
“Deep Purple” was published in 1933 as a piano composition. The following year, Paul Whiteman had it scored for his suave “big band” orchestra that was “making a lady out of jazz” in Whiteman’s phrase. “Deep Purple” became so popular in sheet music sales that Mitchell Parish added lyrics in 1938.

In Appendix 3 of the book Paul Whiteman: Pioneer in American Music, Volume 2, by Don Rayno, published by Rowman & Littlefield in 2012, on page 651 the author says, “Whiteman had his chief arranger, Adolph Deutsch, write an orchestration for it, and this was the first recording of the song to be released.”

Paul Whiteman and his Concert Orchestra — recorded on 11 September 1934; issued on Victor 36131 as the B-side of “Park Avenue Fantasy”

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Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians — (instrumental) recorded on 23 November 1938; issued as the B-side of “Thanks for Everything,” Decca 2215

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Dick Todd and his Orchestra — recorded on Saturday, 17 December 1938; issued on Bluebird 10072, c/w “Are You in the Mood for Mischief”

  • Recording not yet found

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Larry-Clinton-1-d20t50Bea Wain 2

Larry Clinton and his Orchestra, vocal: Bea Wain — recorded on Friday, 23 December 1938; issued on Victor 26141, b/w “A Study in Red”

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1939 Deep Purple-Al Donahue-Vocalion 4596 (c1)1939 Deep Purple-Al Donahue-Conqueror 9175

Al Donahue and his Orchestra — recorded on Sunday, 8 January 1939; issued on Vocalion 4596, c/w “We Speak of You Often” — also issued as the B-side of Conqueror 9175

  • Recording not yet found

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jimmy_dorsey 2Bob Eberly 01

Jimmy Dorsey and his Orchestra, vocal: Bob Eberly — recorded on Tuesday, 10 February 1939; issued on Decca 2295, b/w “Fate (It Was Fate When I First Met You)”

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1939 Deep Purple-Artie Shaw-Bluebird 10178helen-forrest-2a-t0

Artie Shaw and his Orchestra, vocal: Helen Forrest — recorded on Sunday, 12 March 1939; released in April 1939 on the single Bluebird B-10178, b/w “Pastel Blue” (also issued on Montgomery Ward 7957)

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Pour toi / Feelings / Sentimientos / Dis-lui

1975 Feelings-Morris Albert (LP) RCA Victor APL1-1018 (back)-d30Selected links

Song:

Singles:

Morris Albert’s 1973 recording of “Feelings” was a big hit in 1974. The song was adapted, according to a 1987 jury verdict in Federal District Court in Manhattan, by Albert from the song “Pour toi,” composed in 1956 by Louis Gasté, with lyrics by Albert Simonin and his wife Marie-Hélène Bourquin, though it took a successful 1980s copyright infringement suit to legally establish the source of the adaptation and to name Gasté as co-songwriter. Albert also released an alternate version with a Spanish-language lyric, evidently written by himself as he’s the sole songwriter credited on the label (see below), in 1974. In 1975, Israeli-born French pop star Mike Brant recorded a version of “Feelings” titled “Dis-lui” (“Tell him”), with the French lyric by Michel Jourdan.

Line Renaud and Loulou Gasté (1)Line Renaud (1)

Pour toi (m. Louis Gasté, w. Albert Simonin, Marie-Hélène Bourquin)
“Pour toi” was recorded by the singer and actress Line Renaud, wife of Gasté, in 1956, and performed by Dario Moreno in the 1957 film Le Feu aux poudres. The arrangements of the song used by Moreno in the film and in a separate studio recording with an orchestra sound very little like the arrangement used by Albert in his 1973 recording of “Feelings,” though portions of the melody are similar. The 1956 recording by Line Renaud, in part, exhibits slightly greater resemblance to Albert’s “Feelings,” melodically and in tone, but the connection is still a stretch.

Line Renaud — title song from the 1956 EP Pathé ‎(France) 45 EG 232

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Dario Moreno — in the 1956 film Le Feu aux poudres; the performance begins at about :49

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1957 Imploration (EP) Dario Moreno- Philips 432.182 NE

Dario Moreno — from the 1957 EP Imploration, Philips 432.182 NE

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1975 Feelings-Morris Albert (LP) RCA Victor APL1-1018-d20

Feelings (m. Louis Gasté, Morris Albert, w. Morris Albert)

Morris Albert

Feelings — issued in 1974 on the single RCA Victor PB-10279, b/w “This World Today is a Mess” — US chart success: #6, Hot 100; #2, Adult Contemporary; also later released on the 1975 LP Feelings, RCA Victor ‎APL1-1018

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1974 Sentimientos-Morris Albert-(Brazil) Beverly 45-13.508

Sentimientos (aka “Dime”) — issued in 1974 on Beverly ‎(Brazil) 45-13.508; songwriting credited solely to Morris Albert on the label — A recording under the same title released by Mexican singer José José in 1974 has a different lyric.

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Do You Know Where You’re Going To (1973) and Theme From Mahogany (1975)

Do You Know Where You’re Going To (m. Michael Masser, w. Gerry Goffin)

Thelma Houston — single Tamla Motown (New Zealand) TMM.872, b/w “Together” (M. Masser, Pam Sawyer), issued in New Zealand in 1973

1973 Do You Know Where You're Going To-Thelma Houston,Tamla Motown (NZ) TMM.872 (with sleeve)-d201973 Do You Know Where You're Going To-Thelma Houston,Tamla Motown (NZ) TMM.872 (label)-d50

Conflicting reports regarding the year the song was recorded by Thelma Houston, and whether it was released by Motown in the US:

  • Labels of the New Zealand single displayed at 45cat.com, Discogs.com, and SwissCharts.com bear the date 1973. A note in the Discogs.com page on the single says, “Originally scheduled for U.S. release in late 1973 as Motown M-1260, but apparently cancelled. As far as I know, New Zealand is the only country where this single was released.”
  • In its Thelma Houston page, soulwalking.co.uk appears to be three years off on the date of the original single:

Thelma’s 1976 version of the song ‘Do You Know Where You’re Going To’ was set to be released, however, the song was given to Diana Ross as part of the movie soundtrack for the film ‘Mahogany’.

  • In the comments section of an article on the song at SongFacts.com, John in Nashville, Tennessee, says,

“Do You Know Where You’re Going To” was originally recorded by Motown artist Thelma Houston in 1973. Her version was released as Motown single #1260.

In a post featuring the Mahogany soundtrack version with the revised lyric, recorded in 1975 by Diana Ross, blogger Abagond says,

“Do You Know Where You’re Going To” had been kicking around at Motown for years. Thelma Houston was about to do it as a single but then it was given to Diana Ross to use as the theme song for her film “Mahogany” (1975). Thus the strange two-part name. It became one of those theme songs that are more famous than the film itself.

Thelma Houston’s recording of the song is included in the Motown Records singles discography at Global Dog Productions (GDP) as Motown 1260, b/w “Together,” dated July 1973. I’ve used GDP’s discographies periodically over the past couple of years, and have not previously noticed it to be their practice to report in their lists, undifferentiated from verifiable releases, scheduled releases that were cancelled. However, being cancelled is what some of the major discography sites such as Discogs.com and Second Hand Songs report happened to Motown 1260.

The existence of a published catalog number, and the fact that I’ve yet to see or hear of any evidence of a Motown 1260 disc or label, together suggest that a U.S. single release was planned, assigned a catalog number, probably announced in notices, but cancelled. A less likely scenario, one which might help explain the inclusion in the GDP discography, is that a limited number of singles were issued before the record was withdrawn from the market.

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(below) In 2009, Thelma Houston performs “Do You Know Where You’re Going To” using the original 1973 lyric, with a few minor modifications

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Lyric, 1973 version
The Sections I’ve numbered 3 and 4 are heavily rewritten in the 1975 (Diana Ross) version, with only a couple of lines having any resemblance to the the lines they replace. The lines about “Stony Brook” (University, presumably) in section 3 of the 1973 version indicate that the first person, the narrative speaker, is rather down on the institution. While “just hanging out” there, she and the second person (the “you” to whom the monologue is directed) had “had a look,” and having done so the first person concludes that they’d now “seen what nothing’s about.” Section 4 doesn’t slam any places of higher learning, but its relation to the rest of the lyric is far from clear.

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“Do You Know Where You’re Going To?” lyric by Gerry Goffin, 1973 Thelma Houston version — transcribed by doc on 9 June 2014:

1
Do you know where you’re going to
Do you like the things that life is showing you
Where are you going to
Do you know

2
Do you get what you’re hoping for
When you look behind you there’s no open doors
What are you hoping for
Do you know

3
Sometimes while standing still in time
You think you’ll live the thoughts that fill your mind
Now we’ve both been to Stony Brook, just hanging out
We’ve had a look and seen what nothing’s about

repeat 1

4
Now, what am I to say to you
What kind of prayer am I to pray for you
I can only do my best and tell you what I see
And if you see the rest, please send it to me

repeat 1 & 2

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Theme From Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To?) (m. Michael Masser, w. Gerry Goffin) — 1975 version

1975 Theme From Mahogany (Do You Know Where You're Going To) Motown M 1377F (sleeve)Diana Ross-Mahogany 1

From the chapter “Forget Diana,” of the book Diana Ross: A Biography (2014) by J. Randy Taraborelli, page 295:

In September 1975, “Theme from Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To?)” was released. Prior to its release Berry Gordy and Michael Mass, who also composed the soundtrack to the film argued over the mix– the actual sound of the recording. Berry wanted one version released, Michael another. As a last resort to get his way, Michael sneaked in to the recording studio and erased a portion of the version Berry preferred, thereby causing his (Masser’s) version to actually be released. It was a clever trick on Michael’ part, and Berry wasn’t pleased about it at the time. Since then, he’s learned to laugh about it, especially since Michael’s version went straight to number one on the pop charts. It remains one of Diana Ross’s most popular songs. Her performance on it was imaginative and compelling and set the stage beautifully for the release of the movie.

Diana RossMotown M 1377F, issued on 24 September 1975, b/w “No One’s Gonna Be A Fool Forever” (Michael Masser, Pam Sawyer) — chart peaks: #1 Hot 100 (1 week, 24 January 1976), and #1 Easy Listening (1 week, 6 December 1975)

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Let’s Face the Music and Dance

Let’s Face the Music and Dance (Irving Berlin) was originally registered for copyright as an unpublished song on 14 June 1935.* It was introduced in the musical film Follow the Fleet (1936) in a production number in which the song is sung by Fred Astaire (Bake Baker) to Ginger Rogers (Sherry Martin), followed by a dance sequence by the pair.

selected links:

Astaire and Rogers-Follow the Fleet-Let's Face the Music-2a

Astaire and Rogers-Follow the Fleet-Let's Face the Music-1a

Astaire and Rogers-Follow the Fleet-Let's Face the Music-4a

Let’s Face The Music And Dance

Astaire and Rogers-Follow the Fleet-Let's Face the Music-3aThere may be trouble ahead
But while there’s moonlight and music and love and romance
Let’s face the music and dance

Before the fiddlers have fled
Before they ask us to pay the bill
And while we still have the chance
Let’s face the music and dance

Soon
We’ll be without the moon
Humming a diff’rent tune
And then

There may be teardrops to shed
So while there’s moonlight and music and love and romance
Let’s face the music and dance, dance
Let’s face the music and dance

From Wikipedia’s page on Follow the Fleet:

Let’s Face the Music and Dance“: Astaire sings this to Rogers after which the dance begins slowly and culminates in a static exit pose. The dance is filmed in one continuous shot lasting two minutes and fifty seconds. During the first take, Ginger’s dress, which was heavily weighted so as to achieve a controlled swirling action, hit Astaire in the face[7] midway through the routine, though the effect is barely discernible. He nonetheless selected[8] this take out of twenty overall for the final picture.

The set – designed by Carroll Clark under the direction of Van Nest Polglase – is frequently cited as a leading example of Art Deco-influenced art direction known as Hollywood Moderne. Film clips of this routine were featured in the 1981 film Pennies from Heaven – detested by Astaire,[9] – where it was also reinterpreted by Steve Martin and Bernadette Peters with revised choreography by Danny Daniels.

full number (almost)

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from the beginning of the vocal sequence — mirror image (to be replaced)

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Astaire and Rogers-Follow the Fleet-Let's Face the Music-8'Follow the Fleet' Movie Stills

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