Deep Purple: selected early recordings, 1934 and 1938-39

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Deep Purple (m. Peter De Rose, w. Mitchell Parish) — According to various sources, the music was published as a piano composition in 1933, but it was evidently registered for copyright on 7 June 1934 as an unpublished work. Mitchell Parish later wrote a lyric which was first recorded in 1938.

Selected links, song:1934 Deep Purple (Peter De Rose) Paul Whiteman-Victor 36131-B

Songwriters:

From Wikipedia:
“Deep Purple” was published in 1933 as a piano composition. The following year, Paul Whiteman had it scored for his suave “big band” orchestra that was “making a lady out of jazz” in Whiteman’s phrase. “Deep Purple” became so popular in sheet music sales that Mitchell Parish added lyrics in 1938.

In Appendix 3 of the book Paul Whiteman: Pioneer in American Music, Volume 2, by Don Rayno, published by Rowman & Littlefield in 2012, on page 651 the author says, “Whiteman had his chief arranger, Adolph Deutsch, write an orchestration for it, and this was the first recording of the song to be released.”

Paul Whiteman and his Concert Orchestra — recorded on Tuesday, 11 September 1934; issued on Victor 36131 as the B-side of “Park Avenue Fantasy”

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Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians — (instrumental) recorded on Wednesday, 23 November 1938; issued as the B-side of “Thanks for Everything,” Decca 2215

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Dick Todd and his Orchestra — recorded on Saturday, 17 December 1938; issued on Bluebird 10072, c/w “Are You in the Mood for Mischief”

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Larry-Clinton-1-d20t50Bea Wain 2

Larry Clinton and his Orchestra, vocal: Bea Wain — recorded on Friday, 23 December 1938; issued on Victor 26141, b/w “A Study in Red”

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1939 Deep Purple-Al Donahue-Vocalion 4596 (c1)1939 Deep Purple-Al Donahue-Conqueror 9175

Al Donahue and his Orchestra — recorded on Sunday, 8 January 1939; issued on Vocalion 4596, c/w “We Speak of You Often” — also issued as the B-side of Conqueror 9175

  • Recording not yet found

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jimmy_dorsey 2Bob Eberly 01

Jimmy Dorsey and his Orchestra, vocal: Bob Eberly — recorded on Tuesday, 10 February 1939; issued on Decca 2295, b/w “Fate (It Was Fate When I First Met You)”

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1939 Deep Purple-Artie Shaw-Bluebird 10178helen-forrest-2a-t0

Artie Shaw and his Orchestra, vocal: Helen Forrest — recorded on Sunday, 12 March 1939; released in April 1939 on the single Bluebird B-10178, b/w “Pastel Blue” (also issued on Montgomery Ward 7957)

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Pour toi / Feelings / Sentimientos / Dis-lui

1975 Feelings-Morris Albert (LP) RCA Victor APL1-1018 (back)-d30Selected links

Song:

Singles:

Morris Albert’s 1973 recording of “Feelings” was a big hit in 1974. The song was adapted, according to a 1987 jury verdict in Federal District Court in Manhattan, by Albert from the song “Pour toi,” composed in 1956 by Louis Gasté, with lyrics by Albert Simonin and his wife Marie-Hélène Bourquin, though it took a successful 1980s copyright infringement suit to legally establish the source of the adaptation and to name Gasté as co-songwriter. Albert also released an alternate version with a Spanish-language lyric, evidently written by himself as he’s the sole songwriter credited on the label (see below), in 1974. In 1975, Israeli-born French pop star Mike Brant recorded a version of “Feelings” titled “Dis-lui” (“Tell him”), with the French lyric by Michel Jourdan.

Line Renaud and Loulou Gasté (1)Line Renaud (1)

Pour toi (m. Louis Gasté, w. Albert Simonin, Marie-Hélène Bourquin)
“Pour toi” was recorded by the singer and actress Line Renaud, wife of Gasté, in 1956, and performed by Dario Moreno in the 1957 film Le Feu aux poudres. The arrangements of the song used by Moreno in the film and in a separate studio recording with an orchestra sound very little like the arrangement used by Albert in his 1973 recording of “Feelings,” though portions of the melody are similar. The 1956 recording by Line Renaud, in part, exhibits slightly greater resemblance to Albert’s “Feelings,” melodically and in tone, but the connection is still a stretch.

Line Renaud — title song from the 1956 EP Pathé ‎(France) 45 EG 232

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Dario Moreno — in the 1956 film Le Feu aux poudres; the performance begins at about :49

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1957 Imploration (EP) Dario Moreno- Philips 432.182 NE

Dario Moreno — from the 1957 EP Imploration, Philips 432.182 NE

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1975 Feelings-Morris Albert (LP) RCA Victor APL1-1018-d20

Feelings (m. Louis Gasté, Morris Albert, w. Morris Albert)

Morris Albert

Feelings — issued in 1974 on the single RCA Victor PB-10279, b/w “This World Today is a Mess” — US chart success: #6, Hot 100; #2, Adult Contemporary; also later released on the 1975 LP Feelings, RCA Victor ‎APL1-1018

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1974 Sentimientos-Morris Albert-(Brazil) Beverly 45-13.508

Sentimientos (aka “Dime”) — issued in 1974 on Beverly ‎(Brazil) 45-13.508; songwriting credited solely to Morris Albert on the label — A recording under the same title released by Mexican singer José José in 1974 has a different lyric.

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Do You Know Where You’re Going To (1973) and Theme From Mahogany (1975)

Do You Know Where You’re Going To (m. Michael Masser, w. Gerry Goffin)

Thelma Houston — single Tamla Motown (New Zealand) TMM.872, b/w “Together” (M. Masser, Pam Sawyer), issued in New Zealand in 1973

1973 Do You Know Where You're Going To-Thelma Houston,Tamla Motown (NZ) TMM.872 (with sleeve)-d201973 Do You Know Where You're Going To-Thelma Houston,Tamla Motown (NZ) TMM.872 (label)-d50

Conflicting reports regarding the year the song was recorded by Thelma Houston, and whether it was released by Motown in the US:

  • Labels of the New Zealand single displayed at 45cat.com, Discogs.com, and SwissCharts.com bear the date 1973. A note in the Discogs.com page on the single says, “Originally scheduled for U.S. release in late 1973 as Motown M-1260, but apparently cancelled. As far as I know, New Zealand is the only country where this single was released.”
  • In its Thelma Houston page, soulwalking.co.uk appears to be three years off on the date of the original single:

Thelma’s 1976 version of the song ‘Do You Know Where You’re Going To’ was set to be released, however, the song was given to Diana Ross as part of the movie soundtrack for the film ‘Mahogany’.

  • In the comments section of an article on the song at SongFacts.com, John in Nashville, Tennessee, says,

“Do You Know Where You’re Going To” was originally recorded by Motown artist Thelma Houston in 1973. Her version was released as Motown single #1260.

In a post featuring the Mahogany soundtrack version with the revised lyric, recorded in 1975 by Diana Ross, blogger Abagond says,

“Do You Know Where You’re Going To” had been kicking around at Motown for years. Thelma Houston was about to do it as a single but then it was given to Diana Ross to use as the theme song for her film “Mahogany” (1975). Thus the strange two-part name. It became one of those theme songs that are more famous than the film itself.

Thelma Houston’s recording of the song is included in the Motown Records singles discography at Global Dog Productions (GDP) as Motown 1260, b/w “Together,” dated July 1973. I’ve used GDP’s discographies periodically over the past couple of years, and have not previously noticed it to be their practice to report in their lists, undifferentiated from verifiable releases, scheduled releases that were cancelled. However, being cancelled is what some of the major discography sites such as Discogs.com and Second Hand Songs report happened to Motown 1260.

The existence of a published catalog number, and the fact that I’ve yet to see or hear of any evidence of a Motown 1260 disc or label, together suggest that a U.S. single release was planned, assigned a catalog number, probably announced in notices, but cancelled. A less likely scenario, one which might help explain the inclusion in the GDP discography, is that a limited number of singles were issued before the record was withdrawn from the market.

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(below) In 2009, Thelma Houston performs “Do You Know Where You’re Going To” using the original 1973 lyric, with a few minor modifications

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Lyric, 1973 version
The Sections I’ve numbered 3 and 4 are heavily rewritten in the 1975 (Diana Ross) version, with only a couple of lines having any resemblance to the the lines they replace. The lines about “Stony Brook” (University, presumably) in section 3 of the 1973 version indicate that the first person, the narrative speaker, is rather down on the institution. While “just hanging out” there, she and the second person (the “you” to whom the monologue is directed) had “had a look,” and having done so the first person concludes that they’d now “seen what nothing’s about.” Section 4 doesn’t slam any places of higher learning, but its relation to the rest of the lyric is far from clear.

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“Do You Know Where You’re Going To?” lyric by Gerry Goffin, 1973 Thelma Houston version — transcribed by doc on 9 June 2014:

1
Do you know where you’re going to
Do you like the things that life is showing you
Where are you going to
Do you know

2
Do you get what you’re hoping for
When you look behind you there’s no open doors
What are you hoping for
Do you know

3
Sometimes while standing still in time
You think you’ll live the thoughts that fill your mind
Now we’ve both been to Stony Brook, just hanging out
We’ve had a look and seen what nothing’s about

repeat 1

4
Now, what am I to say to you
What kind of prayer am I to pray for you
I can only do my best and tell you what I see
And if you see the rest, please send it to me

repeat 1 & 2

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Theme From Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To?) (m. Michael Masser, w. Gerry Goffin) — 1975 version

1975 Theme From Mahogany (Do You Know Where You're Going To) Motown M 1377F (sleeve)Diana Ross-Mahogany 1

From the chapter “Forget Diana,” of the book Diana Ross: A Biography (2014) by J. Randy Taraborelli, page 295:

In September 1975, “Theme from Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To?)” was released. Prior to its release Berry Gordy and Michael Mass, who also composed the soundtrack to the film argued over the mix– the actual sound of the recording. Berry wanted one version released, Michael another. As a last resort to get his way, Michael sneaked in to the recording studio and erased a portion of the version Berry preferred, thereby causing his (Masser’s) version to actually be released. It was a clever trick on Michael’ part, and Berry wasn’t pleased about it at the time. Since then, he’s learned to laugh about it, especially since Michael’s version went straight to number one on the pop charts. It remains one of Diana Ross’s most popular songs. Her performance on it was imaginative and compelling and set the stage beautifully for the release of the movie.

Diana RossMotown M 1377F, issued on 24 September 1975, b/w “No One’s Gonna Be A Fool Forever” (Michael Masser, Pam Sawyer) — chart peaks: #1 Hot 100 (1 week, 24 January 1976), and #1 Easy Listening (1 week, 6 December 1975)

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Carolina in the Morning

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Carolina in the Morning (m.Walter Donaldson, w. Gus Kahn)

1922_carolina-in-the-morning-donaldson_aileen-stanley_1_f44The song had its debut in the Broadway musical revue The Passing Show of 1922 at the Winter Garden Theater, which opened on 20 September 1922, and closed after 85 performances on 2 December 1922. Vaudeville performers incorporated the song into their acts and helped popularize it. Notable recordings when the song was new were made by such artists as Marion Harris, and Van and Schenck.*
Other artists to have later successes with the song included Bing Crosby, Dean Martin, Jimmy Durante, Dinah Shore, Judy Garland, and Danny Kaye. In 1957, Bill Haley & His Comets recorded a rock and roll version.

The original 1922 lyrics (now public domain in the United States due to age) are given below. The chorus remains well known, but the verses have generally been omitted from vocal performances since the early years of the song’s popularity. The verses give a hint of melancholy to the song, while the chorus on its own can be an almost ecstatic reverie. — adapted from the Wikipedia song profile

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1st verse:
Wishing is good time wasted
Still it’s a habit they say
Wishing for sweets I’ve tasted
That’s all I do all day
Maybe there’s nothing in wishing
But speaking of wishing I’ll say:

chorus:
Nothing could be finer than to be in Carolina in the morning
No one could be sweeter than my sweetie when I meet her in the morning
Where the morning glories
Twine around the door
Whispering pretty stories
I long to hear once more

Strolling with my girlie where the dew is pearly early in the morning
Butterflies all flutter up and kiss each little buttercup at dawning,
If I had Aladdin’s lamp for only a day
I’d make a wish and here’s what I’d say:
Nothing could be finer than to be with Carolina in the morning.

2nd verse:
Dreaming was meant for nighttime
I live in dreams all the day
I know it’s not the right time
But still I dream away
What could be sweeter than dreaming
Just dreaming and drifting away

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1922 Carolina in the Morning--Van and Schenck, Columbia A-3712, recorded on 18 September 1922-d40-g151922 Carolina In the Morning, Van and Shenck, Columbia A 3712

Van and Schenk — recorded on 18 September 1922; issued on Columbia A 3712, c/w “I’m Gonna Plant Myself In My Old Plantation Home”; the recording date is two days prior to the Broadway premiere of The Passing Show of 1922

Video or audio file to be replaced

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Paul Whiteman Orch. c.1922_1

1922 Carolina in the Morning (Donaldson), Paul Whiteman, Victor 18962-A (1)-f8-hx371922 Cow Bells (Al Piantadosi), Zez Confrey, Victor 18962-B-f8-hx50

Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra — recorded on 21 September 1922; issued on Victor 18962, b/w “Cow Bells,” recorded by Zez Confrey and his Orchestra

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Songbook site index

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Billie Holiday_prob. Pep's Musical Bar_25-30 April 1955_21890-1969 selected standards and hits pages
Galleries: performing artist and songwriter
Galleries: film
Songwriters to 1954
Songwriters, 1955-1973
Complete page index
Film Musicals and Revues: selected films and songs, 1929-47
Performing Artist features
Jazz Age
Swing Eras 1 and 2
about the site + selected notes
Friends
Acknowledgments

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Billie Holiday, capebillie-holiday-pearls-1a

Page index (drop-down) browse demo (1a)

(above) header tab 5 generation browse demonstration: Page Index > Songbook site index > Songwriter > Songwriters to 1954 > Berlin, Irving > Berlin pages (11) — correction: The page Irving Berlin: selected songs of 1909 and 1910 is now included in the Berlin drop down index.

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When Your Lover Has Gone

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When Your Lover Has Gone (Einar Aaron Swan)

From the Wikipedia profile of the songwriter:

Einar Swan-1926-with-members-of-Vincent-Lopez-Sax-Section-c1-d40Einar Aaron Swan (born Einar (Eino) William Swan) (March 20, 1903 – August 8, 1940) was an American musician, arranger and composer. Born of Finnish parents who had emigrated to the United States at the turn of the century, he was the second of nine children.

Born in Massachusetts, his father was a keen amateur musician and before Einar Swan had entered his teens, he played violin, clarinet, saxophone and piano. At the age of 16 he was already playing in his own dance band, Swanie’s Serenaders, and travelling around Massachusetts for three years. Swan’s main instrument had been the violin but during this period he switched to alto saxophone.

Around 1924, the bandleader Sam Lanin invited Swan to join his orchestra at New York’s famed Roseland Ballroom, and Swan played with leading musicians such as cornettist Red Nichols, and members of The Charleston Chasers Vic Berton (drums) and Joe Tarto (tuba), with whom he soon started composing and arranging material for the orchestra. He also started arranging for the other resident band at the Roseland Ballroom, Fletcher Henderson’s orchestra.

After five months with Lanin, Swan joined Vincent Lopez’s band in 1925 and went on tour to England. The band at that time also featured Mike Mosiello, Xavier Cugat and his old bandmate Joe Tarto.1931-When-Your-Lover-Has-Gone-(Swan)-1 Shortly thereafter, the Bar Harbor Society Orchestra released “Trail of Dreams” credited to Swan and Klage.

Around 1930 Swan stopped working as a musician and concentrated on arrangements, starting to work for radio programmes and bandleaders such as Eddie Cantor collaborator Dave Rubinoff and Raymond Paige.

In 1931 he wrote “When Your Lover Has Gone” which was featured in the James Cagney film Blonde Crazy (1931). The song became a hit and has since been covered by many other performers such as Lee Wiley, Louis Armstrong, Ethel Waters, Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan and Frank Sinatra.

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Gene Austin — 78 rpm single Victor 22635, c/w Please Don’t Talk About Me When I’m Gone, recorded 5 February 1931

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The Charleston Chasers  —  recorded in New York on  9 February 1931; issued as Columbia 2404-D, b/w Walkin’ My Baby Back Home (m. Fred Ahlert, w. Roy Turk)

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louis armstrong 02

Louis Armstrong and his Orchestra — recorded in Chicago on 29 April 1931 (source: The Louis Armstrong Discography at michaelminn.net); released as Okeh 41498, c/w Blue Again (m. Jimmy McHugh, w. Dorothy Fields)

Armstrong, Louis (Trumpet, Vocal)
Randolph, Zilner (Trumpet)
Jackson, Preston (Trombone)
Boone, Lester (Clarinet, Alto Saxophone)
James, George (Reeds)
Washington, Albert (Clarinet, Tenor Saxophone)
Alexander, Charlie (Piano)
McKendrick, Mike (Banjo, Guitar)
Lindsay, John (Bass)
Hall, Tubby (Drums)

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Te quiero dijiste / Magic is the Moonlight

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Te quiero dijiste (María Grever) — aka Muñequita linda (cute little doll)

IMDb dates the composition 1929. In 1944, the song was used with the original Spanish lyric in the Esther Williams film Bathing Beauty, performed by Carlos Ramírez with The Xavier Cugat Orchestra. With an English lyric written by Charles Pasquale, the song acquired the second title, Magic is the Moonlight. According to IMDb, in addition to the Cugat and Ramírez performance, the song was played during the opening credits, whistled by Red Skelton, and appeared often in the score. It’s not clear to me whether the English lyric was used in the film at all, though the sheet music cover below suggests that the English lyric was published or republished around the time the film was released.

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Selected Te quiero dijiste / Magic is the Moonlight recordings and live performances:

Alfonso Ortiz Tirado — 1930

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Rosita Serrano — The “Chilean Nightingale” — 1938

Excepts from the Wikipedia profile,

Rosita Serrano…was a Chilean singer who had her biggest success in Nazi Germany between the 1930s and the early 1940s. Because of her bell-like voice and pitch-perfect whistling she received the nickname Chilenische Nachtigall (Chilean Nightingale).[1]

Her voice style was mainly operatic coloratura soprano with a deep, fast vibrato. She added frequent embellishments such as soaring arpeggiation and melisma. Some songs were recorded with a few words whispered or spoken, and she occasionally emphasized words with a gritty, growling jazz style reminiscent of African-American blues singer Ethel Waters. She was a pitch-perfect whistler in the manner of Bing Crosby.[1] The songs she recorded in German and Spanish varied from folk to pop, including flamenco, rumba, tango and mambo.[1]  [read more]

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Carlos Ramírez with The Xavier Cugat Orchestra — in the film Bathing Beauty (1944)

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Jane Powell —  “Magic is the Moonlight” (m. María Grever, w. Charles Pasquale) — from the musical comedy film Nancy Goes to Rio (1950)

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Los Panchos with Raúl Shaw Moreno — c. 1951

Adapted from the Wikipedia article on Los Panchos (aka Trío Los Panchos):

Los Panchos first met in 1944 in New York City. The three original members were Alfredo Gil and Chucho Navarro, both from Mexico, and Hernándo Avilés from Puerto Rico. All three played guitar and contributed vocally. Los Panchos reached fame with their romantic songs, especially in Latin America where they are still regarded as one of the top trios of all time. They also appeared in around fifty movies mostly during the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema.

Julito Rodríguez  joined the group in 1952. [read more]

From the Wikipedia (Spanish) profile of Raúl Shaw Moreno, poorly translated:

In 1951, in Santiago de Chile, Hernando Aviles, first voice of Trio Los Panchos left the band in full continental tour due to his frequent disputes with Alfredo Gil.In these circumstances, Alfredo Gil and Chucho Navarro travel to Bolivia, with the urgency of finding a replacement for Avilés, in order to continue the tour. It is in these circumstances that, in the month of November 1952, Raúl Shaw Moreno auditioned for the two remaining members of Los Panchos , Chucho Navarro and Alfredo Gil . In a room of Sucre Palace Hotel, Magaly singing for them, being accepted to [immediately] replace Hernando Aviles . His debut as lead vocalist of Los Panchos comes at a recital A broadcast, as used in those years, in the Auditorium of Radio Minería in Santiago de Chile.

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Softly, As in a Morning Sunrise

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Softly, As in a Morning Sunrise (m. Sigmund Romberg, w. Oscar Hammerstein II) was written for and introduced in the 1928 operetta The New Moon.

Wikipedia says,

One of the best-known numbers from the show, it is a song of bitterness and yearning for a lost love, sung in the show by Philippe (tenor), the best friend of the hero, Robert Mission (baritone).

The original song was composed as a tango, and features a dance as accompaniment to the choral reprise, but many versions of the song have changed the tempo completely….What some may consider the most ludicrous version is the one featured in the 1940 film version of the operetta, in which it is actually sung as a cheerful ditty by Nelson Eddy while he shines his shoes, despite the melancholy nature of the song’s lyric.

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Artie Shaw_white jacket_1

Artie Shaw 1938

Jazzstandards.com says, “Ten years after this tune was written, Shaw had Jerry Gray arrange the tune. (Within a few years Gray would be arranger for Glenn Miller). Shaw’s version was one of his best selling records.”

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Milt Jackson Quartet — recorded in NYC, April 1952 — Milt Jackson (vib) John Lewis (p) Percy Heath (b) Kenny Clarke (d) — released on The Quartette (Savoy MG 12046)

Presently unavailable

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Modern Jazz Quartet — recorded at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, NJ, 2 July 1955 — Milt Jackson (vib) John Lewis (p) Percy Heath (b) Connie Kay (d); released on the 1955 album Concorde (Prestige PRLP 7005)

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Bing Crosby with Buddy Cole and his Trio — recorded 14 March 1957; released on the LP New Tricks

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Parisian Pierrot – 1923

Parisian Pierrot (Noël Coward)

Answers.com says:

According to Richard Briers in Coward & Company, the playwright wrote “Parisian Pierrot” for his close friend Gertrude Lawrence in his review London Calling! but apparently she didn’t think much of it. The song was to be performed wearing a Pierrot costume, and Lawrence gave both to her understudy in André Charlot’s Revue of 1924, Jessie Matthews. In New York, she changed her mind and performed it herself, although she didn’t record it until November 3, 1931 – a pressing that was originally rejected. Coward recorded it in 1936.

According to the Noël Coward Society, Coward wrote the song in Berlin between December 9th and 18th, 1922. It was published in 1923 by Keith Prowse of London.

Coward himself said “The idea of it came to me in a night-club…a frowsy blonde, wearing a sequin chest-protector and a divided skirt, appeared in the course of the cabaret with a rag Pierrot doll dressed in black velvet. She placed it on a cushion where it sprawled in pathetic abandon while she pranced around it emitting gutteral [sic] noises. Her performance was unimpressive but the doll fascinated me”. The title came into his head in the taxi on his way back to the hotel.

Gertrude Lawrence died in 1952, and in 1968 Julie Andrews performed the song in her biopic Star!. (thanks, Alexander Baron – London, England, for all above)

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Noël Coward – 1936

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Julie Andrews in Star!, a Gertrude Lawrence biopic – 1968

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Texas – Twentieth-Century Blues – The Songs Of Noël Coward (1998)

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