time washes clean, love’s wounds unseen

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It’s been a while since I published a new page, almost ten months! I hadn’t planned to keep you waiting that long, but the path that one’s life will take is not always easy to foresee. Anyway, it’s been a long time. Hope you enjoy this one.

This is a post announcing the new page. Here’s a link to the page:

Long Long Time (Gary White) — first recorded by Linda Ronstadt and issued on the 1970 album Silk Purse

In an undated interview with David Bromberg conducted by the Huffington Post, promoting the release of Bromberg’s 2011 album Use Me, according to a transcription provided at DavidBromberg.net, the artist said:

Well, Linda [Ronstadt] and I have been friends for a very long time. I think she may give me more credit than I deserve. For instance, one night, we were together in The Village in New York, and she had just had a hit with the song “Different Drum” but nothing else seemed to catch. So, I brought her back to the apartment I was living in, into my friend Gary White’s room, and I called Paul Siebel and had him come up as well. Gary and Paul sang Linda songs all night. When she left, she shared a cab with Jerry Scheff who suggested she listen to The McGarrigle Sisters’ “Heart Like A Wheel,” but that song came much later. Her next recording was a collection of Gary White and Paul Siebel tunes*, and she had a hit with Gary White’s “Long, Long Time,” which was the hit that revived her career.

Recordings included in the page:

Linda Rondstadt recording and early television performances

  • Linda Ronstadt — from her album Silk Purse, (US) Capitol Records ST-407, released in March 1970; also issued in June 1970 on the single Capitol 2846, b/w “Nobodys” (Gary White) — Although the title of the song is sometimes given as “Long, Long Time,” with a comma, the Silk Purse album track and the subsequent single were each titled “Long Long Time,” so I’m going with this spelling.
  • Linda Ronstadt — live performance recorded for television series Playboy After Dark, Season 2, Episode 21, taped on 16 April 1970**; original broadcast date unknown
  • Linda Ronstadt — from The Johnny Cash Show, Episode 2.4, airdate: 14 October 1970
  • Linda Ronstadt with Bobby Darin (on acoustic guitar) — from the television special The Darin Invasion, taped in October 1970 but broadcast in October 1971, according to a page on the Linda Ronstadt Forum that features an extensive list of television appearances by Ronstadt in the 1970s
  • Linda Ronstadt — from television series The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour, Season 3, Episode 16; airdate: 10 January 1971
  • Linda Ronstadt — live television studio performance for the series The Midnight Special, Season 1, Episode 1 (pilot episode); airdate: 19 August 1972

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selected recordings by other artists

  • Claudine Longet — issued in October 1970 on the single Barnaby ZS7 2022, as the B-side of “Broomstick Cowboy” — The recording was also included on her 1971 album We’ve Only Just Begun, (US) Barnaby Z 30377
  • Gene Ammons — from the 1970 album The Black Cat! (Prestige)
  • Harry Belafonte and Eloise Laws (duet) — from the 1973 Harry Belafonte album Play Me, (US, Canada) RCA Victor APL1-0094
  • Jody Miller — from her 1974 album House of the Rising Sun, (US, Canada) Epic ‎KE 32569
  • Larry Santos — from his 1975 album Larry Santos, (US) Casablanca NBLP 7018; in October 1976 it was issued on the single Casablanca NB 869, b/w “You Are Everything I Need” (Santos)
  • Lynn Anderson — from her 1976 album All the King’s Horses, (US) Columbia KC 34089
  • Tracy Huang — from her 1977 LP Portrait, (Singapore)‎ EMI EMGS 5042
  • Melanie Safka — from her self-released 1996 album Unchained Melanie
  • Smiffenpoofs — from the 1999 CD album Twelve
  • Babs — published on YouTube on 17 Jul 12012
  • Bryce Hitchcock — published 7 March 2014

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* This is an inaccurate description of Silk Purse, which has among its ten tracks two songs written by Gary White and one by Paul Siebel. Perhaps other songs by these two were recorded during the sessions but not included on the album.

** I’ve used either tv.com or Internet Movie Database (IMDb) in identifying the season and episode, and (when available) both the taping date and broadcast date for each of the television show performances of the song by Linda Ronstadt included in the new page. However, a single page on the Linda Ronstadt Forum features an extensive list of 1970s television appearances by Ronstadt that provides more or less the same information.

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What is a “Songbook standard”?

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Songbook champagne header 1a

The following page, published on 17 March, was substantially revised and expanded on 21-22 March (latest revision, 2 July 2017):

See also the relevant comment exchange between Robert Silvestri and myself at the bottom of the page.

summer break

surfer_girl_sun_2

Hi,

Greetings to all my visitors, new and old. The purpose of this message is to announce that I have decided to take a break from creating and posting new work on the site until at least mid-September. Will post an update should my plans change in the interim. During the break, I might allow the maintenance to slip a bit more than usual, so that visitors may find a few more deleted videos than normal on the site. Will try to keep it looking presentable. Also, I will continue to respond promptly to comments.

Hope you all enjoy the summer. Best wishes.

Regards, doc

Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me

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Bobby Troup and Julie London-4Bobby Troup and Julie London-5

(above) Bobby Troup and Julie London — source: JulieLondon.org

Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me (Bobby Troup) — date published unknown

I’m aware of only the few recordings of the song included below, by Teri Thornton, Julie London, Bobby Troup, and Marilyn Maye. I’ve often wondered why the song did not become well-known and often covered. Perhaps the triple rhymes and off-rhymes —  “Yesterday” / “here’s today,” “cold again” / “fold again,” “be content” / “be so bent,” “serener place” / “greener place,” etc. — were thought to be outdated or artificial. Such constructions may have been considered passé long before Troup published this song. Among American popular song lyricists of the 20th century, triple rhymes are most closely associated with Lorenz Hart.

On the day before creating and publishing this post, I noticed that someone had entered the site via a keyword search looking for the lyric to “Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me.” I didn’t have it. In fact, I’d been periodically looking for the lyric for the previous four or five years. So, after another round of searches came up empty I decided to transcribe it. The following transcription is drawn from the taped live performance by Bobby Troup and (presumably) his band for the 1965 Julie London TV variety special, Julie: Something Special.

Won’t Someone Please Belong to Me — words and music by Bobby Troup

Yesterday, things looked bright
I never knew a kiss so right
But here’s today — I’m out in the cold again
Just like a sheep that’s lost from his fold again
Won’t someone please belong to me

Find my love, mind my love
Try not to be unkind, my love
Just be content — there is no serener place
Don’t be so bent in finding a greener place
Won’t someone please belong to me

A fool am I
You’d think someday I’d learn
For fools like I
The tables never turn
But I’m not wise
I’m always taken by surprise, surprise

Days are long
Nights are long
Time seems so slow when things go wrong
Won’t someone new come here and be mad to be
Near someone who is true and so glad to be
Won’t someone please, please, please belong to me
Please belong to me
Please belong to me

transcribed by Jim “doc” Radcliff on 10 March 2015 *

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1965 Won't Someone Please Belong to Me (Troup)-Teri Thornton Columbia 4-43209 (B-side)

Teri Thornton — B-side of the 45 rpm single “To Remember You By,” Columbia 4-43209, issued on 25 January 1965

Note: Despite each of the following two videos purporting to contain a copy of the B-side of Columbia 4-43209, though the second contains an image which suggests that it might be from a promotional copy of the single, they aren’t even close to being the same length, one being several seconds shorter than the 2:25 stated on the label and the other several seconds longer. The recording in video 1 is about 2:20 in length, while that in video 2 is about 2:32, though they do sound like the same recording. I surmise that at some point perhaps either the shorter one was slightly sped up, the longer one slowed down, or both.

video 1

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video 2

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Bobby Troup — from the album Kicks on 66, released on 14 November 1995 — The year of the recording of this track is unknown, possibly 1965. Though the AllMusic.com page on the album indicates that the tracks were recorded in “1965 & 1969,” the review by Nick Dedina on the page refers to the recordings as “these transcriptions from the early 1960s.”

Thanks to visitor KLR for informing me about this recording in a comment dated 7 August 2017, and for providing a link to a YouTube video containing the track.

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Bobby Troup Quartet — live, from the Julie London TV variety special Julie: Something Special, air date: 17 November 1965

personnel (according to the Library of Congress)::

  • Bobby Troup – piano
  • Dennis Budimir – guitar
  • Don Bagley – bass
  • Denells Barton – drums

JulieLondon.org says,

On November 17th, 1965 WGN-TV in Chicago aired an hour-long special titled Julie: Something Special. Julie sings many of her popular numbers and is joined by, now husband, Bobby Troup and the quartet, The Hi-Lo’s. All of their performances are included. This show was re-aired on NBC-TV on February 13th, 1967.

It must have been the rebroadcast on NBC which I saw as a child of nine, for I recalled this performance decades later when I came across the video several years ago.

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1965 Feeling Good-Julie London (LP) Liberty LST-7416

Julie London — from the 1965 LP Feeling Good: with the Gerald Wilson Big Band, LRP-3416 (Mono), LST-7416 Stereo

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The Second of Maye, Marilyn Maye, (US) RCA Victor LSP-3546, released in 1966

Marilyn Maye — from the live album The Second of Maye, (US) RCA Victor LSP-3546, released in 1966 [Thanks to visitor Helen, whose helpful comment made me aware of this recording.]

From marilynmaye.com:

This album marked the second collaboration of Marilyn and Joe Rene. It was recorded live at The Living Room, a then-famous New York nightclub, and released in 1966. Joining Marilyn was The Sammy Tucker Quintet featuring Sammy Tucker, her husband at the time, on the piano. The album notes were penned by Skitch Henderson, then-musical director for The Tonight Show.

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* “Days” and “Nights” are reversed in the first two lines of the final section in the versions by Teri Thornton, Julie London, and Marilyn Maye. The line “Won’t someone new come here and be mad to be” is slightly different in the Thornton and London versions, the first word being “Please” instead of “Won’t,” and “glad” replacing “mad.” However, the second line of the section is identical to the Troup version in the London recording (she sings “glad” in both lines, twice), yet very different in the Thornton recording, which goes “Near someone true, as true as you’ll ever be.” The lyric sung by Marilyn Maye in her live version also displays other minor differences from each of the others. She replaces the word “sheep” with “lamb,” and modifies the phrase “bent in,” in the expression “Don’t be so bent in,” to “bent on.”

For other lyric transcriptions by yours truly see the page Unsung lyrics, transcribed by doc.

Pour toi / Feelings / Sentimientos / Dis-lui

1975 Feelings-Morris Albert (LP) RCA Victor APL1-1018 (back)-d30Selected links

Song:

Singles:

Morris Albert’s 1973 recording of “Feelings” was a big hit in 1974. The song was adapted, according to a 1987 jury verdict in Federal District Court in Manhattan, by Albert from the song “Pour toi,” composed in 1956 by Louis Gasté, with lyrics by Albert Simonin and his wife Marie-Hélène Bourquin, though it took a lengthy and eventually successful 1980s copyright infringement suit to legally name Gasté as co-songwriter. Albert also released an alternate version with a Spanish-language lyric, in 1974, which was evidently written by himself, as he’s the sole songwriter credited on the label (see below). In 1975, Israeli-born French pop star Mike Brant recorded a version of “Feelings” titled “Dis-lui” (“Tell him”), with the French lyric written by Michel Jourdan.

Line Renaud and Loulou Gasté (1)Line Renaud (1)

Pour toi (m. Louis Gasté, w. Albert Simonin, Marie-Hélène Bourquin)
“Pour toi” was recorded by the singer and actress Line Renaud, wife of Gasté, in 1956, and performed by Dario Moreno in the 1957 film Le Feu aux poudres. The arrangements of the song used by Moreno in the film and in a separate studio recording with an orchestra sound very little like Morris Albert’s 1973 recording of “Feelings,” though portions of the melody are similar. The 1956 recording by Line Renaud, in part, exhibits slightly greater resemblance to Albert’s “Feelings,” melodically and in tone, but it seems like a rather large leap to find that the melody of “Feelings” was copied or stolen from the French song.

The claim made by the plaintiff Gasté that Albert “gained access” to the virtually unknown song “Pour toi” through his publisher Fermata, which “had had some dealings with Gasté’s publishing company, Les Editions Louis Gasté, in the 1950s” was unaccompanied by evidence that such access was ever obtained.

Line Renaud — title song from the 1956 EP Pathé ‎(France) 45 EG 232

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Dario Moreno — in the 1956 film Le Feu aux poudres; the performance begins at about :49

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1957 Imploration (EP) Dario Moreno- Philips 432.182 NE

Dario Moreno — from the 1957 EP Imploration, Philips 432.182 NE

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1975 Feelings-Morris Albert (LP) RCA Victor APL1-1018-d20

Feelings (m. Louis Gasté, Morris Albert, w. Morris Albert)

Morris Albert

Feelings — issued in 1974 on the single RCA Victor PB-10279, b/w “This World Today is a Mess” — US chart success: #6, Hot 100; #2, Adult Contemporary; also later released on the 1975 LP Feelings, RCA Victor ‎APL1-1018

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1974 Sentimientos-Morris Albert-(Brazil) Beverly 45-13.508

Sentimientos (aka “Dime”) — issued in 1974 on Beverly ‎(Brazil) 45-13.508; songwriting credited solely to Morris Albert on the label — A recording under the same title released by Mexican singer José José in 1974 has a different lyric.

More

Songbook site index

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Billie Holiday, probably at Pep's Musical Bar, 25-30 April 1955 (2)1890-1969 selected standards and hits pages
Galleries: performing artist and songwriter
Galleries: film
Songwriters to 1954
Songwriters, 1955-1975
Complete page index
Film Musicals and Revues: selected films and songs, 1929-47
Performing Artist features
Jazz Age
Swing Eras 1 and 2
about the site + selected notes
Friends
Acknowledgments

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Posts:

billie-holiday-pearls-1a

Page index (drop-down) browse demo (1a)

(above) header tab 5 generation browse demonstration: Page Index > Songbook site index > Songwriter > Songwriters to 1954 > Berlin, Irving > Berlin pages (11) — correction: The page Irving Berlin: selected songs of 1909 and 1910 is now included in the Berlin drop down index.

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When Your Lover Has Gone

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When Your Lover Has Gone (Einar Aaron Swan)

From Wikipedia:

Einar Swan-1926-with-members-of-Vincent-Lopez-Sax-Section-c1-d40Einar Aaron Swan (born Einar (Eino) William Swan) (March 20, 1903 – August 8, 1940) was an American musician, arranger and composer. Born of Finnish parents who had emigrated to the United States at the turn of the century, he was the second of nine children.

Born in Massachusetts, his father was a keen amateur musician and before Einar Swan had entered his teens, he played violin, clarinet, saxophone and piano. At the age of 16 he was already playing in his own dance band, Swanie’s Serenaders, and travelling around Massachusetts for three years. Swan’s main instrument had been the violin but during this period he switched to alto saxophone.

Around 1924, the bandleader Sam Lanin invited Swan to join his orchestra at New York’s famed Roseland Ballroom, and Swan played with leading musicians such as cornettist Red Nichols, and members of The Charleston Chasers Vic Berton (drums) and Joe Tarto (tuba), with whom he soon started composing and arranging material for the orchestra. He also started arranging for the other resident band at the Roseland Ballroom, Fletcher Henderson’s orchestra.

After five months with Lanin, Swan joined Vincent Lopez’s band in 1925 and went on tour to England. The band at that time also featured Mike Mosiello, Xavier Cugat and his old bandmate Joe Tarto.1931-When-Your-Lover-Has-Gone-(Swan)-1 Shortly thereafter, the Bar Harbor Society Orchestra released “Trail of Dreams” credited to Swan and Klage.

Around 1930 Swan stopped working as a musician and concentrated on arrangements, starting to work for radio programmes and bandleaders such as Eddie Cantor collaborator Dave Rubinoff and Raymond Paige.

In 1931 he wrote “When Your Lover Has Gone” which was featured in the James Cagney film Blonde Crazy (1931). The song became a hit and has since been covered by many other performers such as Lee Wiley, Louis Armstrong, Ethel Waters, Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan and Frank Sinatra.

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Gene Austin — 78 rpm single Victor 22635, c/w Please Don’t Talk About Me When I’m Gone, recorded on 5 February 1931

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The Charleston Chasers  —  recorded in New York on  9 February 1931; issued as Columbia 2404-D, b/w Walkin’ My Baby Back Home (m. Fred Ahlert, w. Roy Turk)

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louis armstrong 02

Louis Armstrong and his Orchestra — recorded in Chicago on 29 April 1931 (source: The Louis Armstrong Discography at michaelminn.net); released as Okeh 41498, c/w Blue Again (m. Jimmy McHugh, w. Dorothy Fields)

Armstrong, Louis (Trumpet, Vocal)
Randolph, Zilner (Trumpet)
Jackson, Preston (Trombone)
Boone, Lester (Clarinet, Alto Saxophone)
James, George (Reeds)
Washington, Albert (Clarinet, Tenor Saxophone)
Alexander, Charlie (Piano)
McKendrick, Mike (Banjo, Guitar)
Lindsay, John (Bass)
Hall, Tubby (Drums)

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More

Top five reasons why Songbook might close (go private) soon

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5. Maintaining the site takes too much time. Due to the 5,000 [2016 update: closer to 10,000] odd embedded videos on the site, none of which are downloaded — they’re just borrowed from various libraries — the site takes a ridiculous amount of time for daily maintenance. Youtube, in particular, removes and destroys videos at an alarming rate, usually citing copyright claims by one of the major music groups (Sony, WMG, EMI, etc.).

I’ve got a number of other sites which have been either completely neglected or nearly so during the past two years because of the huge amount of time spent developing and maintaining Songbook. I’d like to revise and reopen some of those sites, and may open a new popular music site soon, beginning at 1960.

4. Because of the unstable nature of most of my posts and pages (disappearing videos), I have not the luxury of letting the site run on autopilot for any length of time without it sustaining heavy damage. I don’t want a visitor to enter a page only to find that six out of ten videos either don’t play or don’t exist anymore.

3. Waning visitor interest: The site has experienced a drop-off of visitors in late spring or early summer each year since it opened in 2009. Last year, the traffic declined 40% from May to June. The June drop was steeper in 2010. So I was a bit surprised that the traffic held fairly steady for a couple of weeks after the college spring semester ended this year, and even increased in volume briefly in early June. However, a steady fall in daily visitors began about two weeks ago, and a sharp decline is evident in the past few days (since June 27).

As it has in previous years, the present downward trend may turn and slowly recover as summer drifts toward autumn, but there are other signs that interest in the site is waning. Songbook has never received a large amount of comments, but lately my visitors have grown positively mum. A total of four comments, excluding spam (which is growing), in the past 32 days.

2. My favorite period is the mid-1960s to early 1970s. I’ve been itching to shift my focus to this era. At the same time, my interest in music of earlier decades has grown rather cold. However, I don’t get the impression that many of my visitors are eager to follow in the direction I’m going. There’s been relatively little interest in my Burt Bacharach index (presently 15 feature pages, with more to come) which constitutes one the largest tributes to an artist on the site. Also, excluding the song Corcovado, my Antonio Carlos Jobim pages (11 individually featured songs) have attracted little interest until the past week during which The Girl from Ipanema has also charted in the top twelve most visited. A Goffin and King page, brief as it is, drew more attention than I expected for a while.

I don’t know if I’ve had a single visitor as yet to my page Songwriters, from 1955 (in construction), published about 7 weeks ago, in which I lay out some of my projected plans at that time for the future of the site, the songwriters of the 1960s, ’70s, and beyond which I’d be likely to focus upon in this project. But unmentioned there is my intention to also do annual hits pages. These may become central features of the project, along with special features on such topics as selected songwriters, bands and solo artists, and albums. It won’t be the Billboard top ten or twenty, but my selection of hits gleaned from the year-end Hot 100 charts.

The maintenance duties on previous posts and pages continue to delay and hamper my efforts to focus on the 1960s. I’ve also been preoccupied with some external matters during the past couple of months. What I envision for the 1960s and early 1970s is potentially a large project which will require focused and intense work over a series of months.

I’m not sure I have the energy to carry through with the project at this time. Maybe the project needs to be freed from the constraints of, and the oft-perceived conflicts with, music of the classic American popular song era (which still constitutes a major portion of this site). Why not begin a new site with 1960? Something will probably happen by September.

1. The yips.

Yours truly,

doc

30 June 2012

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I Got It Bad (and That Ain’t Good)

I Got It Bad (and That Ain’t Good) – m. Duke Ellington, w. Paul Francis Webster

links:

Duke Ellington and his Orchestra, vocal by Ivie Anderson — recorded on 26 June 1931; issued on Victor 27531, b/w “Chocolate Shake” — issued in the UK on HMV B.9252

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(below) 1942 Soundie, I Got It Bad and That Ain’t Good

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Benny Goodman and his Orchestra, vocal by Peggy Lee

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George Wein & the Newport All-Stars – Copenhagen, Denmark, 1969, featuring Ruby Braff — Ruby Braff cornet, Joe Venuti violin, Barney Kessel guitar, Red Norvo vibraphone, Larry Ridley bass, Don Lamond drums, George Wein piano

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Duke Ellington and Ben Webster — Newport Jazz Festival 1971 in Tivoli, Copenhagen

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Keith Jarrett – Tokyo, 1987

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