Irving Berlin: selected songs of 1909 and 1910

1909

Good Bye, Girlie, and Remember Me (m. George W. Meyers, w. Irving Berlin)

The provider says:

In our recreation of the performance of Goodbye, Girlie, and Remember Me, Jon Finson, Professor of Music at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, plays the role of the illustrator, accompanied by Alicia Levin on the piano. The slides come from the MarNan Collection in Minneapolis, courtesy of Margaret Bergh.

____________________

That Mesmerizing Mendelssohn Tune (w. m. Irving Berlin)

Description in The Complete Lyrics of Irving Berlin, page 14:

Published. Copyrighted December 22, 1909. Music “adapted” in part from Felix Mendelssohn’s Spring Song (“Lied ohn Worte,” op. 62 , no. 6 — “Frühlingslied”). Title page lists the year of copyright as 1910. A huge success for Berlin; it sold over one million copies of sheet music. Top-selling recordings were by Arthur Collins and Byron Harlan (Victor, Columbia, Edison Amberol, and U.S. Everlasting). The sheet music cover bears the subtitle “Mendelssohn Rag.”

piano solo by

_______________________

Wild Cherries (m. Ted Snyder, w. Irving Berlin) – The song was introduced by Fanny Brice in Ziegfeld Follies of 1910. It had previously been published and copyrighted as an instrumental (piano rag) in 1908.

Video provider identifies this recording as,

Xylophone Solo by Schmehl, 2min. Albany Indestructible cylinder #1147, (Sept. 1909). Played on a 1911 Edison Standard Model D phonograph.

________________________

My Wife’s Gone to the Country (Hurrah! Hurrah!) – w. m. George M. Whiting, Irving Berlin, and Ted Snyder

Bob Roberts1909 cylinder recording

.

Arthur Collins – 1909

.

Roller Organ

______________

Sadie Salome (Go Home) w. m. Irving Berlin and Edgar Leslie

The Complete Lyrics of Irving Berlin (p. 7) says,

Published. Copyrighted April 2, 1909. Words and music by Irving Berlin and Edgar Leslie. Alternate title: “Sadie Salome Go Home!” Sung in vaudeville by Fanny Brice; many sources indicate that it played an important part in starting her career. Best-selling records by Edward M. Favor (Edison) and Bob Roberts (Columbia).

Ian Whitcomb – from his 1967 album Yellow Underground

_____________________

Yiddle, On Your Fiddle, Play Some Ragtime

Stanley Kirkby – recorded c.1912. Although this provider doesn’t mention it, the Polyphon recording by vocalist Kirkby was evidently made under the pseudonym”Charles Lester.” According to the site Bless ‘Em All: the Songs of Fred Godfrey, Kirkby also recorded under the names “Frank Miller,” and “Arthur Joyce,” as well as under the name “Stanley Kirkby.” The latter may be his real name, but so far I’ve been unable to find much of anything about him.

>>>>>>>>>>><<<<<<<<<<<

1910

Call Me Up Some Rainy Afternoon (Irving Berlin)

Ada Jones with the American Quartet, featuring Billy Murray – 1910

.

Bing Crosby and Judy Garland on The Bing Crosby (Radio) Show, broadcast 7 Feb 1951

_________________


Kiss Me, My Honey, Kiss Me
(m. Ted Snyder, w. Irving Berlin)

Ada Jones and Billy Murray

_______________

1910 Berlin & Snyder-That Beautiful Rag-11910-That-Beautiful-Rag-Berlin-Snyder-3-Dale-Fuller

Oh, That Beautiful Rag (m. Ted Snyder, w. Irving Berlin)

From The Complete Lyrics of Irving Berlin, p.23,

Published. Copyrighted July 9, 1910. Music by Ted Snyder. According to noted Berlin collector Vince Motto…it was introduced by Dale Fuller in The Girl and the Kimono, at the Ziegfeld Theatre, Chicago, beginning June 25, 1910. That show closed shortly after its Chicago opening. Introduced in New York in the musical Up and Down Broadway (July 18, 1910; Casino Theatre; 72 performances) by Irving Berlin (vocal) and Ted Snyder (piano), who were billed as “Entertainers in the Cafe de L’Obster.”

Collins & Harlan, the comedy team of Arthur Collins and Byron G. Harlan – Nov 1910. According to The Complete Lyrics of Irving Berlin, p.23, the best-selling recording was by Arthur Collins alone on the Columbia and Zonophone labels. This is another recording, preserved on celluloid cylinder, by the Albany Indestructible Record Company.

.

Sweet Italian Love (Irving Berlin)

Billy Murray- 1910

.

Oh, How That German Could Love (m. Ted Snyder, w. Irving Berlin)

According to the Complete Lyrics of Irving Berlin (ed. Kimball and Emmet, 2001) p. 18, the song was introduced by Sam Bernard (photo at right) during the post-Broadway tour of his show The Girl and the Wizard. The Broadway run at the Casino Theatre, (9/27/1909 – 12/18/1909) was followed by a brief run at the West End Theatre in New York (12/27/1909 – circa. 1/1910). Bernard and the show are given notice at the top of the sheet music, which features an image of the star in costume. The sheet music cover appears to be signed by Irving Berlin.

__________________

Irving Berlin — recorded for Columbia in January 1910

.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

free
web stats

  • 2,433,793 views