A summer night’s magic, enthralling me so

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Howdy. This post serves is to announce the expansion of the previously published feature Under a Blanket of Blue. I’ve added a dozen recordings over the past couple of days, plus a list of of the 32 recordings included in the page, and made it into a three part feature. Here are links to the three parts (or pages) of the feature:

Each page of the feature has links to all three pages. Recordings included in the feature still cover the time span 1933-1963, as they did before these additions. I may eventually add some more recent recordings.

1933-Under-a-Blanket-of-Blue-Glen-Gray-1

Under a Blanket of Blue (m. Jerry Livingston*, w. Al J. Neiburg and Marty Symes) — 1933 standard

Recordings added to the page yesterday and today:

  • The Southern Sisters — recorded in London on 10 October 1933; issued on the single (UK) Decca F.3690, c/w “Sentimental Gentleman from Georgia”
  • Paramount 6247 piano roll, played by Larry Arden — 1933
  • Maxine Gray with orchestra directed by David Rose — radio transcription; from the 27 June 1940 episode of the California Melodies program (see Old Time Radio Downloads, Old Time Radio Catalog OTRCAT.com)
  • Glenn Miller and his Orchestra — from the 19 December 1940 episode of the Chesterfield Cigarettes “Moonlight Serenade” radio series
  • Barry Wood and The Melody Maids, with orchestra directed by Henry Sylvern — radio transcription; from, according to the video provider, a 1946 episode of The Barry Wood Show
  • Benny Goodman Sextet – recorded in New York on 30 July 1952; released on the 1954 album The New Benny Goodman Sextet, Columbia CL 552 — session personnel: Benny Goodman (cl), Terry Gibbs (vib), Teddy Wilson (p), Mundell Lowe (g), Sid Weiss (b), Don Lamond (d)
  • Art Tatum – Benny Carter – Louis Bellson — recorded on 25 June 1954 in Los Angeles, CA; originally released on the 1958 album Makin’ Whoopee, Verve Records MG V-8227
  • Billy Tipton Trio — from the 1955 album Sweet Georgia Brown, Tops L1522
  • Jane Froman — from the 1957 album Songs At Sunset, Capitol Records T889/T-889; also included on the 1957 EP Songs At Sunset, Part 2, Capitol EAP 2-889
  • Doris Day — from her 1957 LP Day By Night, Columbia CL 1053

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* credited under his birth name, Jerry Levinson

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High on a hilltop, love is calling

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Tonight (Tuesday) I published a page on another jazz standard with a spring theme. The new page is here:

Suddenly It’s Spring

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Suddenly It’s Spring (m. Jimmy Van Heusen, w. Johnny Burke)

The song was registered for copyright on 7 December 1943. It was recorded by Ginger Rogers and Don Loper — according to IMDb, SecondHandSongs, and others — for the 1944 feature film Lady in the Dark, though it was cut from the film. A post on the song at The Ginger Rogers Resource says:

Miss Ginger Rogers recorded the song “Suddenly It’s Spring” for the movie Lady in the Dark. When the movie was released in 1944, the song had been left on the cutting room floor BUT the recording was put on a record…

However, the link provided there to a Rogers recording at archive.org is dead, and I’ve been unable to locate the recording elsewhere.

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A chronological list of recordings of the song included in the page:

  • Hildegarde — recorded on 4 January 1944; issued on the 78 rpm single Decca 23297, b/w “Leave Us Face It (We’re In Love)”
  • Ginny Simms — recorded on 28 January 1944; issued on the single Columbia 36693, b/w “Irresistible You”
  • Glenn Miller and the Army Air Force Band , vocal: Johnny Desmond — recorded on 19 February 1944; available on the album The Missing Chapters – Volume 1: American Patrol (2007)
  • Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra, vocal: Eugenie Baird — recorded on 28 February 1944; issued on the 78 rpm single Decca 18596, b/w “Sure Thing” (Jerome Kern, Ira Gershwin)
  • Jerry Cooper with orchestra directed by Wilbur Hatch — evidently a radio broadcast transcription — The provider says, “from June 1, 1944 Spotlight On Music” and “orchestra directed by Wilbur Hatch.”
  • Frank Sinatra – I haven’t been able to date or locate this recording. My guess would be mid- to late 1940s. The audience applause at the beginning suggests that it’s from a live show, though that could be canned. Steve Albin’s extensive list of songs recorded by Sinatra doesn’t include “Suddenly It’s Spring.” The quality of the recording is low. Update: A comment below by 1jazzguy, dated 2018/03/18 at 8:34 am, says:

Sinatra’s version is from a 1945 radio *broadcast.
*From an unknown source, added to the AFRS rebroadcast.

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  • The Fabulous Five — from the 1966 album Lara’s Theme, Power Records D406 (Mono), DS 406 (Stereo)
  • Joe Albany — from the 1972 album Proto-Bopper, released on Revelation Records in the US and Spotlite Records in the UK
  • Zoot Sims Quartet— recorded on 26 May 1983 in New York City; from the 1983 LP Suddenly It’s Spring, Pablo Records 2310-898
  • Fraser MacPherson Quartet — from the 1987 album Honey and Spice, Justin Time JUST-23-1

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