And please sleep long enough to dream

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New page published today, on the 1942 Irving Berlin song “I’m Getting Tired So I Can Sleep,” from This Is The Army. The song was included on the second page of my Irving Berlin: selected “I’m” songs feature published a few days ago, but after adding several more recordings of “Getting Tired” the feature had grown very long, with over 45 videos and audio players included. Although I could have expanded the feature to three pages, I decided instead to create a separate page for that one song. Here’s a link to the new page:

I’m Getting Tired So I Can Sleep

From The Complete Lyrics of Irving Berlin, edited by Robert Kimball and Linda Emmet (2001), p. 358:

Published. Copyrighted June 18, 1942. Introduced by Private William Horne and an “Octette” consisting of Sergeant Zinn Arthur, Corporal James Burrell, and Privates Orville Race, James Farrell, Thomas Chetlin, William Collier, Earl Lipp, and Donald McCray. The idea for the song came from the Yip, Yip, Yaphank song “Dream On, Little Soldier Boy.”* Leading recording by Jimmy Dorsey and His Orchestra (Decca).

Recordings included are as follows:

  • Claude Thornhill and his Orchestra, vocal: Terry Allen — recorded on 19 June 1942 and issued in 1942 on the 78 rpm single (US) Columbia 36658, b/w “Rock-A-Bye Bay”; issued in Canada on Columbia C687 with the same B-side
  • Kenny Baker with Harry Sosnick and his Orchestra — recorded on 26 June 1942; issued on Decca 18442, c/w “I Left My Heart at the Stage Door Canteen”
  • Jimmy Dorsey and his Orchestra, vocal: Bob Eberly — recorded on 14 July 1942; issued in August 1942 on the 78 rpm single Decca 18462, b/w “Ev’ry Night About This Time”
  • Hal McIntyre and his Orchestra, vocal: Jerry Stuart — recorded on 22 July 1942; issued on Victor 27951, b/w “This Is the Army, Mr. Jones”
  • Pvt. Stuart Churchill and Soldier Octet with Orchestra and Octet Under Direction of Cpl. Milton Rosenstock — recorded on 28 July 1942; released on the 78 rpm single Decca 18475, as the B-side of “The Army’s Made a Man of Me”; also released in 1942 on the 4 disk original all-soldier Broadway cast album This Is the Army, Decca A-340, and the LP single disk version of the album, Decca DL 5108

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  • Victor “First Nighter” Orchestra, with vocals by Brad Reynolds (lead) and Men’s Chorus — recorded on 30 July 1942 and issued 21 August 1942 on the 78 rpm single Victor 27956, b/w “That’s What the Well Dressed Man in Harlem Will Wear” (B-side vocal by Fats Waller and Men’s Chorus)
  • Barry Wood – issued c. mid-August 1942 on the 78 rpm single Bluebird B-11572, b/w “Why Don’t You Fall in Love with Me (As Long As You’re Not in Love With Anyone Else)”
  • Harry James and his Music Makers, vocal: Johnny McAfee — from the album Live broadcast from the Astor Roof on August 28, 1942, released (according to Discogs.com) in 1979
  • Dennis Day — medley: “I’m Getting Tired So I Can Sleep” / “I’ll See You In My Dreams”; in a transcription of the “Liberty Ship” episode of the Jack Benny Show (radio), broadcast on 6 December 1942
  • Stuart Foster — from, according to the video provider, “January 19, 1943 Victory Parade Of Spotlight Bands orchestra directed by Ina Ray Hutton”
  • Dinah Shore — from, according to the video provider, “February 3, 1943 Eddie Cantor It’s Time To Smile radio program

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While daisies nod hello

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It’s so restful in the country
It’s the right kind of diet
You really ought to try it

You lie and dream
Beside a stream
While daisies nod “Hello”

After adding several more recordings to the new page on the Alec Wilder song “It’s So Peaceful in the Country,” it became too large. So I split it up into two parts:

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Recordings included:

part 1, 1941-1960

  • Mildred Bailey and the Delta Rhythm Boys – recorded on 24 June 1941; issued on the 78 rpm single Decca 3953, b/w “Lover, Come Back to Me!” (m. Sigmund Romberg, w. Oscar Hammerstein II), B-side recorded by Mildred Bailey — The chorus precedes the verse in this version.*

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  • Charlie Spivak and his Orchestra, vocal: Garry Stephens – recorded on 27 June 1941, and issued on the 78 rpm single OKeh 6291, c/w “What Word is Sweeter than Sweetheart”
  • Harry James and his Orchestra, vocal: Dick Haymes — recorded on 30 June 1941; issued on Columbia 36246, as the B-side of “Yes Indeed!” (Oliver)
  • Barbary Coast Orchestra, of Dartmouth College — label dated 7 December 1942
  • Percy Faith and Mitch Miller — title track from the 1956 album Columbia Records CL 779
  • Mundell Lowe — recorded at Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, NJ on 20 February 1956; released on the 1956 LP Guitar Moods, Riverside Records RLP 12-208 (Mono)
  • Patti Page — from The Patti Page Show, possibly Episode 1.2, broadcast on 23 June 1956
  • June Christy – from her 1957 album Gone for the Day, Capitol T902 — with orchestra arranged and conducted by Pete Rugolo
  • Dick Johnson Quartet — recorded in NYC on 30 October 1957; released on the 1957 album Most Likely…, Riverside Records RLP 12-253
  • The Creed Taylor Orchestra — from the 1958 album Shock Music in Hi-Fi, ABC Paramount Records ABC-259 (Mono), ABCS-259 (Stereo)
  • Tony Bennett with Ralph Sharon and his Orchestra — issued on 16 February 1959 on the 45 rpm single Columbia Records 4-41341, b/w “Being True to One Another”
  • Nelson Riddle — originally released on the 1959 album The Joy of Living, (US) Capitol Records T 1148 (Mono), ST 1148 (Stereo)
  • Joe Wilder — originally released on the 1959 album The Pretty Sound, (US) Columbia CL 1372 (Mono), CS 8173 (Stereo)
  • The Frank Wess Quartet — recorded at Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, on 9 May 1960; released on the 1960 self-titled album (US) Moodsville MVLP 8

  • Tak Shindo — from the 1960 album Accent on Bamboo, (US) Capitol Records T-1433 (Mono), ST-1433 (Stereo)

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City living is a pretty living
It’s so full of unexpected thrills
But there’s too much stone
Too much telephone
There’s too much of everything but trees and hills

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