I’ve been for a walk on a winter’s day

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So I published a page today on the song “California Dreamin’,” written by John Phillips and Michelle Phillips in 1963 and recorded by The Mamas and the Papas in November 1965. Here’s a link to the page:

California Dreamin’

 

Selected recordings included in the page:

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  • The Mamas and the Papas – live at the Monterey Pop Festival, Sunday, 18 June 1967
  • The Brass Ring, featuring Phil Bodner — issued in September 1966 on the single Dunhill D-4047, b/w “Samba De Orfeo (Black Orpheus)” — This seems to have been the same track featured on the Brass Ring albums Lara’s Theme (1966) and The Dis-Advantages of You (1967), each released on Dunhill Records.
  • Bud Shank — first track on the 1966 album California Dreamin’, (US) World Pacific WPS-21845, WS-21845, and also issued in 1966 on the single World Pacific 77824 — 45cat.com suggests that the single World Pacific 77824 (also WP-77824) was issued in May 1966. However, this may be incorrect because according to JazzDisco.org, the session that produced World Pacific 77824 occurred in August 1966.
  • Hugh Masekela – initial track on the 1966 LP Hugh Masekela’s Next Album, MGM Records E-4415 (Mono), SE-4415 (Stereo)
  • Bobby Womack — from Womack’s debut studio album, Fly Me to the Moon, Minit LP-24014, released in 1968; also issued in November 1968 on the single Minit 32055, b/w “Baby, You Oughta Think It Over”
  • José Feliciano

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  • Igginbottom — from their 1969 album ‘Igginbottom’s Wrench, (UK) Deram DML 1051 (Mono), SML 1051 (Stereo)
  • Winston Francis — originally released in 1970 on the album California Dreaming, (Jamaica, UK) Bamboo BDLPS 216; also issued on the 1970 single (Jamaica) Bamboo BAM 48, b/w “Soul Stew” (B-side by Jackie Mittoo & Sound Dimention)
  • Rosa Maria (Rosa Marya Colin) — originally released in 1988 on the single (Brazil) Estúdio Eldorado ‎ MIX 136.88.0542, b/w “Summertime II (B-side by Rosa Maria and Tony Osanah); also included on the 1989 album Rosa Maria, (Brazil) Philips 838 003-1
  • John Phillips — from the 2001 album Phillips 66, Eagle Records WK18854
  • Jim Young — instrumental, published 19 June 2013
  • Monophonics — from their 2018 album Mirrors, Transistor Sound TSR006 (CD), TSR-006 (12-inch disc)
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A summer night’s magic, enthralling me so

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Howdy. This post serves is to announce the expansion of the previously published feature Under a Blanket of Blue. I’ve added a dozen recordings over the past couple of days, plus a list of of the 32 recordings included in the page, and made it into a three part feature. Here are links to the three parts (or pages) of the feature:

Each page of the feature has links to all three pages. Recordings included in the feature still cover the time span 1933-1963, as they did before these additions. I may eventually add some more recent recordings.

1933-Under-a-Blanket-of-Blue-Glen-Gray-1

Under a Blanket of Blue (m. Jerry Livingston*, w. Al J. Neiburg and Marty Symes) — 1933 standard

Recordings added to the page yesterday and today:

  • The Southern Sisters — recorded in London on 10 October 1933; issued on the single (UK) Decca F.3690, c/w “Sentimental Gentleman from Georgia”
  • Paramount 6247 piano roll, played by Larry Arden — 1933
  • Maxine Gray with orchestra directed by David Rose — radio transcription; from the 27 June 1940 episode of the California Melodies program (see Old Time Radio Downloads, Old Time Radio Catalog OTRCAT.com)
  • Glenn Miller and his Orchestra — from the 19 December 1940 episode of the Chesterfield Cigarettes “Moonlight Serenade” radio series
  • Barry Wood and The Melody Maids, with orchestra directed by Henry Sylvern — radio transcription; from, according to the video provider, a 1946 episode of The Barry Wood Show
  • Benny Goodman Sextet – recorded in New York on 30 July 1952; released on the 1954 album The New Benny Goodman Sextet, Columbia CL 552 — session personnel: Benny Goodman (cl), Terry Gibbs (vib), Teddy Wilson (p), Mundell Lowe (g), Sid Weiss (b), Don Lamond (d)
  • Art Tatum – Benny Carter – Louis Bellson — recorded on 25 June 1954 in Los Angeles, CA; originally released on the 1958 album Makin’ Whoopee, Verve Records MG V-8227
  • Billy Tipton Trio — from the 1955 album Sweet Georgia Brown, Tops L1522
  • Jane Froman — from the 1957 album Songs At Sunset, Capitol Records T889/T-889; also included on the 1957 EP Songs At Sunset, Part 2, Capitol EAP 2-889
  • Doris Day — from her 1957 LP Day By Night, Columbia CL 1053

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* credited under his birth name, Jerry Levinson

Look out, it’s coming in your direction

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Hi, folks! Hope you’ve been having a splendid summer. I published a new page tonight (Thursday 30 August), on the song “I’m Gonna Make You Love Me.” It was written by Kenny Gamble, Leon Huff, and Jerry Ross*, and introduced in 1966 by Dee Dee Warwick. Here’s a link to the page:

I’m Gonna Make You Love Me

The page includes the following recordings:

  • Dee Dee Warwick with back vocals by Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson — issued in November 1966 on the single Mercury 72638**, c/w “Yours Until Tomorrow” (Goffin & King) — produced by Jerry Ross, arranged by Jimmy Wisner — US singles chart success: #13 R&B, #88 Hot 100 in December 1966

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  • Dee Dee Warwick — B-side of the single (UK) Mercury MF 953, issued in December 1966, with “Yours Until Tomorrow” as the A-side
  • Jerry Butler — from the 1967 album Soul Artistry, Mercury Records SR 61105, SR-61105 (Stereo), MG 21105, MG-21105 (Mono)
  • Madeline Bell — originally released in November 1967 on her album Bell’s A Poppin’, and issued in January 1968 on the single Philips 40517, b/w “Picture Me Gone” (Taylor, Gorgoni) — Billboard Hot 100 singles chart success: #26 Hot 100, #32 R&B in April 1968
    • Madeline Bell — Beat Club promo video

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  • Aesop’s Fables — issued in July 1968 on the single Cadet Concept 7005, b/w “They Go Out and Get It” — also released in 1969 on the LP (US, Canada) In Due Time, Cadet Concept LPS-323
  • Diana Ross & the Supremes and The Temptations — A recording of “I’m Gonna Make You Love Me” is included on their collaborative album Diana Ross & the Supremes Join the Temptations, which was released on 8 November 1968. Less than two weeks later, a slightly shorter edit (2:56 vs. 3:05 on the album) was issued on the single Motown M 1137 (also M-1137, MOTOWN 1137, etc.), b/w “A Place in the Sun.” Released on 21 November 1968, it became a top ten hit, peaking at #2 for two weeks in December that year.
  • The Lennon Sisters — originally released on their 1968 album The Lennon Sisters Today!!, Mercury SR 61164, SR-61164
  • The Temptations — performed live on The Ed Sullivan Show, Season 21, Episode 16 — airdate: 2 February 1969
  • Stevie Wonder and Diana Ross — live performance taped for the television series The Hollywood Palace, Season 6, Episode 22 — airdate: 8 March 1969
  • Reuben Wilson — recorded at Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 21 March 1969; released on the 1969 album Love Bug, Blue Note BST 84317 — personnel: Reuben Wilson – organ, Lee Morgan – trumpet, George Coleman – tenor saxophone, Grant Green – guitar, Leo Morris – drums
  • Count Buffalo & The Jazz Rock Band — from the album Soul & Rock, (Japan) Denon ‎CD-5010, released on 25 July 1969
  • Peter Nero — originally released on his 1969 album I’ve Gotta Be Me, Columbia CS 9800; album reissued in the UK in 1973 under the title Piano Magic of Peter Nero, Embassy EMB 31008
  • Roy Meriwether — from his 1969 album Preachin‘, Capitol Records, ST 243, ST-243

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See also Songbook’s other Gamble & Huff pages:

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* Although Billboard, on page 18 of its 12 November 1966 issue, and the labels of early recordings credited only “Gamble-Ross” (Kenny Gamble and Jerry Ross) as writers of the song, BMI presently credits Kenny Gamble, Leon Huff, and Jerry Ross as the songwriters. On disagreements regarding the songwriting credits, Wikipedia says:

Most versions of the song credit the songwriting to Jerry Ross and Kenny Gamble, who were the only two writers named on original record labels. Some recordings also credit Jerry Williams as a third writer, although BMI and some other sources credit Leon Huff, rather than Williams.

** According to 45cat.com, “I’m Gonna Make You Love Me” is on the A-side of the US single Mercury 72638, and “Yours Until Tomorrow” is on the B-side. This order is confirmed in the 12 November 1966 issue of Billboard Magazine, where the single is announced on page 18, in the “Pop Spotlights” column. On the corresponding UK single, Mercury MF 953, the sides are reversed.

The world over was blue clover

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Late Saturday night (28 April) I published a page on the song “One Morning in May,” with music by Hoagy Carmichael and words by Mitchell Parish. Here’s a link to the new page:

One Morning in May

Links to the page have been added to the following relevant page indexes:

The first recording of “One Morning in May” that I’m aware of is that by Hoagy Carmichael and his Orchestra in Chicago in October 1933, an instrumental recording. Lanny Ross recorded the song in November 1933, possibly the first vocal recording, with accompaniment by an orchestra directed by Ray Sinatra. The Ross recording and a January 1934 recording by Emil Coleman and his Palais Royal Orchestra each feature a verse section that I haven’t heard in any other recordings of the song. A 16 November 1933 instrumental recording by Wayne King and his Orchestra was issued on (US) Brunswick 6735, c/w “Song of Surrender.”

In 1934 it was recorded by numerous bands and orchestras, including those led by the following: Emil Coleman, Harry Roy, Roy Fox, Ray Noble (with vocal by Al Bowlly), Bert Ambrose, Jack Payne, and Geraldo (Gerald Walcan Bright), and by Marion Harris with an orchestra that I haven’t yet identified. These were all vocal versions. The list suggests that the song may have been more popular in the UK than in the US early on. I’ve omitted videos or audio files of all of the early vocal recordings, mainly because I find it an ordeal to listen to them. I try to explain why in the page. I’ve yet discover any recordings of the song made during the years 1935-1951.

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  • Hoagy Carmichael and his Orchestra — recorded in Chicago on 10 October 1933; issued on the 78 rpm single Victor 24505, b/w “Armful Of Trouble,” B-side recorded by Don Bestor and his Orchestra

personnel (according to sources 12, 3):
Hoagy Carmichael – piano, Elvan ” Fuzzy” Combs (as J. Coombs) — alto sax,  Fred Murray – trumpet, Bob Vollmer* – drums, unknown – clarinet, unknown – guitar, unknown – bass

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  • Robert Farnon and his Orchestra — recorded on 26 June 1952; released in March 1953 on the LP Victor Schertzinger Suite / Hoagy Carmichael Suite, Decca Records LK 4055, (US) London Records LL 623
  • The Murray Arnold Quartet — from the 1956 album Overheard in a Cocktail Lounge, MGM Records E3457
  • The Octet of Max Albright — from the album Mood for Max, Motif Records ML502, release date unknown; album recorded in Los Angeles, CA, on 8, 16, and 23 November 1956 — also released on the album A Swingin’ Gig, Tampa Records TP 2 (color vinyl, 1957; black vinyl, 1958) — among members of the octet/session personnel are: Max Albright – drums, vibes, bells; Buddy Collette – alto sax, tenor sax, clarinet, flute; Gerald Wiggins –  piano
  • Buddy Cole — theater pipe organ solo, from his 1957 LP Pipes, Pedals and Fidelity, (US) Columbia CL 1003 (Mono), and (US, Canada) Columbia CS 8065
  • George Shearing Quintet and Orchestra — from the 1957 album Black Satin, (US) Capitol Records T858 and Capitol T-858 (Mono), (UK) Capitol T 858 (Mono) — According to Discogs.com, stereo versions of the album weren’t released until 1959.
  • Benny Carter — from his 1959 album Aspects, (US) United Artists Records UAL 4017 (Mono), UAS 5017 (Stereo) — instrumentation on this track: Benny Carter – alto & tenor saxophone, Joe Comfort – bass, Shelly Manne – drums, Bobby Gibbons – guitar, Arnold Ross – piano, as well as two other tenor saxes, and a horn section including five trumpets and two trombones

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  • Pete Jolly Trio — from the 1965 album Too Much, Baby!, Columbia CL 2397 (Mono), CS 9197 (Stereo) — Pete Jolly – piano, Chuck Berghoffer – bass, Nicholas Martinis – drums
  • Frankie Randall — from the 1965 album Sings & Swings, RCA Victor LPM-2967
  • Art Van Damme Quintet — from the 1967 LP The Gentle Art of Art, (Germany) SABA SB 15 114 ST; also issued in the UK in 1968 on Polydor 583 713
  • Bert Kaempfert — from the 1969 album One Lonely Night, (Germany, UK) Polydor 184 313
  • Carrie Smith with the Loonis McGlohon Trio — recorded in Columbia, SC, in November 1976; released in 1994 on the album Fine & Mellow, Audiophile ACD-164
  • Jim Callum Jazz Band — from the 1990 CD album Hooray for Hoagy!, Audiophile Records ACD-251
  • Barbara Lea, Bob Dorough, Dick Sudhalter and others — from the 1994 album “Hoagy’s Children” In a Celebration of Hoagy Carmichael’s Songs, Volume One, Audiophile ACD-291 — The album is a partly a reissue of the 1983 album Hoagy’s Children – Songs Of Hoagy Carmichael, Audiophile AP-165, but it’s augmented by several more recently recorded tracks. This track was recorded at Seltzer Sound in New York on 17 June 1993.
  • Bill Charlap Trio —  from the album Stardust, Blue Note 7243 5 35985 2 5 (also Blue Note 35985); album recorded 6-8 September 2001 at The Hit Factory in NYC, and released in 2002 — Bill Charlap – piano, Peter Washington – bass, Kenny Washington – drums
  • Paul Kuhn Trio — live performance, from the CD album Unforgettable Golden Jazz Classics, IN+OUT 77050 — According to the site jazzlists.com, the album was released in 2002. However there is certainly no consensus upon that date. Among other release dates for the album claimed by merchants and discographers are 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014, and 2016.
  • Randy Carmichael — piano solo, published on YouTube, 4 July 2008 — The performer is the second son of Hoagy Carmichael. The video provider says: “After dinner, Randy Carmichael graciously performed at the home of Ed and Judy Thornberg in Richmond, Indiana.”
  • Herbie Steward, Gene DiNovi, Dave Young, Yukio Kimura — from the LP One Morning in May, (Japan) Marshmallow Export MMEX-118LP, released on 21 January 2008
  • trio, featuring 二村希一(piano), 加藤泉(guitar), 横山裕(bass) — 10 November 2011, Tokyo

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Some early vocal recordings, not included in the page:

  • Lanny Ross with orchestra directed by Ray Sinatra – recorded on 27 November 1933; issued on Victor 24493, c/w “The Harbor of Home Sweet Home.”
  • Emil Coleman and his Palais Royal Orchestra, vocal: Jerry Cooper — recorded in New York, New York on 11 January 1934; issued on Columbia 2877-D, c/w “On the Wrong Side of the Fence” — In the UK the same two sides were issued on Regal Zonophone MR 1282, under the name “The Broadway Bandits.”
  • Harry Roy and his Orchestra (from the May Fair Hotel), w/ vocal refrain — recorded on 20 March 1934; issued in May 1934 on (UK) Parlophone R1812, c/w “Mama Don’t Want No Peas an’ Rice an’ Cocoanut Oil”
  • Roy Fox and his Band, vocal: Denny Dennis — recorded on 26 March 1934; issued on (UK) Decca F3943 (F.3943). c/w “You Oughta Be in Pictures”
  • Jack Payne and his Band, vocal: Billy Scott-Coomber — recorded in March 1934, according to RateYourMusic.com, and released in May 1934, according to 78rpmcommunity.com, on (UK) Rex 8147, c/w “Let’s Fall in Love”
  • Ray Noble and his Orchestra, vocal: Al Bowlly — recorded on 5 April 1934, (HMV)
  • Marion Harris with unidentified orchestral accompaniment – issued in April 1934 on (UK) Decca F.3954, b/w “Oo-oo-ooh! Honey (What You Do to Me)”
  • Geraldo and his Sweet Music, with unidentified vocalist —  1934 Pathetone short film, identified at britishpathe.com as film ID#1096.14. The original is or was evidently part of the contents of canister PT 216.

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* However, according to the book  Stardust Melody: The Life and Music of Hoagy Carmichael, (2009), Richard M. Sudhalter, p. 159, the drummer was Andy Van Sickle.

Stirring to sing love’s magic music

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Today I published a page on the song “Some Other Spring.” The songs, with music by Irene Kitchings and words by Arthur Herzog, Jr., was registered for copyright in 1939. The first recording seems to have been that by Billie Holiday and her Orchestra, during a session on Wednesday, 5 July 1939. The song is primarily known and performed as a jazz standard. The new page is here:

Some Other Spring

lyric: Poetry Countdown, Billie Holiday Songs, International Lyrics Playground

recordings included in the page:

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  • Teddy Wilson and his Orchestra, vocal: Jean Eldridge — recorded in NYC on 12 September 1939 (1), (2); issued on the single Columbia 35298, c/w “Hallelujah!”
  • Austin Powell Quintet — recorded on 26 February 1951; issued in April 1951 on the 45 rpm single Decca 9-48206, b/w “All This Can’t Be True” — and on the 78 rpm single Decca 48206
  • Benny Carter Quintet with Joe Glover Orchestra — recorded at Reeves Sound Studios, NYC, 18 September 1952; originally released on the 10-inch 1954 Benny Carter album The Formidable Benny Carter, Norgran Records MGN-21; later included on the 1956 album Alone Together, Norgran Records MGN 1058, which seems to contain the eight tracks from the 1954 album plus four additional tracks, and is credited on the front cover to “Benny Carter and his strings with the Oscar Peterson Quartet”
  • Jimmy Raney Quartet — recorded at Van Gelder Studios, New York, 28 May 1954; originally released on the 1954 10-inch LP Jimmy Raney Quartet, New Jazz NJLP 1101, which was released in the UK as The Quartet Plays — The four tracks on the 1954 EP were later included as the first four tracks on the LP album A, Prestige PRLP 7089, released in 1957, according to RateYourMusic.com (see link below). “A” album info: JazzDisco.org, RateYourMusic.com, Discogs.com.
  • Art Tatum Trio — recorded in Los Angeles on 27 January 1956; released on the 1957 album Presenting…The Art Tatum Trio, (US) Verve Records MGV-8118

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  • Carmen McRae — from her 1962 album Sings Lover Man And Other Billie Holiday Classics, (US) Columbia CL 1730, which was released on the Philips label in the UK
  • Karin Krog & Dexter Gordon — from the 1970 LP Some Other Spring, Blues and Ballads, (Norway) Sonet SLPS 1407, (Japan) Sonet UPS-2021-N
  • Tommy Flanagan TrioMedley: Some Other Spring / Easy Living — live, 13 July 1977 at the Montreux Jazz Festival; audio released on the 1977 album Montreux ’77, (US) Pablo 2308-202 (I haven’t identified the source of the video footage.) — Tommy Flanagan – piano, Keter Betts – bass, Bobby Durham – drums

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time washes clean, love’s wounds unseen

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It’s been a while since I published a new page, almost ten months! I hadn’t planned to keep you waiting that long, but the path that one’s life will take is not always easy to foresee. Anyway, it’s been a long time. Hope you enjoy this one.

This is a post announcing the new page. Here’s a link to the page:

Long Long Time (Gary White) — first recorded by Linda Ronstadt and issued on the 1970 album Silk Purse

In an undated interview with David Bromberg conducted by the Huffington Post, promoting the release of Bromberg’s 2011 album Use Me, according to a transcription provided at DavidBromberg.net, the artist said:

Well, Linda [Ronstadt] and I have been friends for a very long time. I think she may give me more credit than I deserve. For instance, one night, we were together in The Village in New York, and she had just had a hit with the song “Different Drum” but nothing else seemed to catch. So, I brought her back to the apartment I was living in, into my friend Gary White’s room, and I called Paul Siebel and had him come up as well. Gary and Paul sang Linda songs all night. When she left, she shared a cab with Jerry Scheff who suggested she listen to The McGarrigle Sisters’ “Heart Like A Wheel,” but that song came much later. Her next recording was a collection of Gary White and Paul Siebel tunes*, and she had a hit with Gary White’s “Long, Long Time,” which was the hit that revived her career.

Recordings included in the page:

Linda Rondstadt recording and early television performances

  • Linda Ronstadt — from her album Silk Purse, (US) Capitol Records ST-407, released in March 1970; also issued in June 1970 on the single Capitol 2846, b/w “Nobodys” (Gary White) — Although the title of the song is sometimes given as “Long, Long Time,” with a comma, the Silk Purse album track and the subsequent single were each titled “Long Long Time,” so I’m going with this spelling.
  • Linda Ronstadt — live performance recorded for television series Playboy After Dark, Season 2, Episode 21, taped on 16 April 1970**; original broadcast date unknown
  • Linda Ronstadt — from The Johnny Cash Show, Episode 2.4, airdate: 14 October 1970
  • Linda Ronstadt with Bobby Darin (on acoustic guitar) — from the television special The Darin Invasion, taped in October 1970 but broadcast in October 1971, according to a page on the Linda Ronstadt Forum that features an extensive list of television appearances by Ronstadt in the 1970s
  • Linda Ronstadt — from television series The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour, Season 3, Episode 16; airdate: 10 January 1971
  • Linda Ronstadt — live television studio performance for the series The Midnight Special, Season 1, Episode 1 (pilot episode); airdate: 19 August 1972

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selected recordings by other artists

  • Claudine Longet — issued in October 1970 on the single Barnaby ZS7 2022, as the B-side of “Broomstick Cowboy” — The recording was also included on her 1971 album We’ve Only Just Begun, (US) Barnaby Z 30377
  • Gene Ammons — from the 1970 album The Black Cat! (Prestige)
  • Harry Belafonte and Eloise Laws (duet) — from the 1973 Harry Belafonte album Play Me, (US, Canada) RCA Victor APL1-0094
  • Jody Miller — from her 1974 album House of the Rising Sun, (US, Canada) Epic ‎KE 32569
  • Larry Santos — from his 1975 album Larry Santos, (US) Casablanca NBLP 7018; in October 1976 it was issued on the single Casablanca NB 869, b/w “You Are Everything I Need” (Santos)
  • Lynn Anderson — from her 1976 album All the King’s Horses, (US) Columbia KC 34089
  • Tracy Huang — from her 1977 LP Portrait, (Singapore)‎ EMI EMGS 5042
  • Melanie Safka — from her self-released 1996 album Unchained Melanie
  • Smiffenpoofs — from the 1999 CD album Twelve
  • Babs — published on YouTube on 17 Jul 12012
  • Bryce Hitchcock — published 7 March 2014

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* This is an inaccurate description of Silk Purse, which has among its ten tracks two songs written by Gary White and one by Paul Siebel. Perhaps other songs by these two were recorded during the sessions but not included on the album.

** I’ve used either tv.com or Internet Movie Database (IMDb) in identifying the season and episode, and (when available) both the taping date and broadcast date for each of the television show performances of the song by Linda Ronstadt included in the new page. However, a single page on the Linda Ronstadt Forum features an extensive list of 1970s television appearances by Ronstadt that provides more or less the same information.

What is a “Songbook standard”?

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Songbook champagne header 1a

The following page, published on 17 March, was substantially revised and expanded on 21-22 March (latest revision, 2 July 2017):

See also the relevant comment exchange between Robert Silvestri and myself at the bottom of the page.

Pour toi / Feelings / Sentimientos / Dis-lui

1975 Feelings-Morris Albert (LP) RCA Victor APL1-1018 (back)-d30Selected links

Song:

Singles:

Morris Albert’s 1973 recording of “Feelings” was a big hit in 1974. The song was adapted, according to a 1987 jury verdict in Federal District Court in Manhattan, by Albert from the song “Pour toi,” composed in 1956 by Louis Gasté, with lyrics by Albert Simonin and his wife Marie-Hélène Bourquin, though it took a lengthy and eventually successful 1980s copyright infringement suit to legally name Gasté as co-songwriter. Albert also released an alternate version with a Spanish-language lyric, in 1974, which was evidently written by himself, as he’s the sole songwriter credited on the label (see below). In 1975, Israeli-born French pop star Mike Brant recorded a version of “Feelings” titled “Dis-lui” (“Tell him”), with the French lyric written by Michel Jourdan.

Line Renaud and Loulou Gasté (1)Line Renaud (1)

Pour toi (m. Louis Gasté, w. Albert Simonin, Marie-Hélène Bourquin)
“Pour toi” was recorded by the singer and actress Line Renaud, wife of Gasté, in 1956, and performed by Dario Moreno in the 1957 film Le Feu aux poudres. The arrangements of the song used by Moreno in the film and in a separate studio recording with an orchestra sound very little like Morris Albert’s 1973 recording of “Feelings,” though portions of the melody are similar. The 1956 recording by Line Renaud, in part, exhibits slightly greater resemblance to Albert’s “Feelings,” melodically and in tone, but it seems like a rather large leap to find that the melody of “Feelings” was copied or stolen from the French song.

The claim made by the plaintiff Gasté that Albert “gained access” to the virtually unknown song “Pour toi” through his publisher Fermata, which “had had some dealings with Gasté’s publishing company, Les Editions Louis Gasté, in the 1950s” was unaccompanied by evidence that such access was ever obtained.

Line Renaud — title song from the 1956 EP Pathé ‎(France) 45 EG 232

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Dario Moreno — in the 1956 film Le Feu aux poudres; the performance begins at about :49

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1957 Imploration (EP) Dario Moreno- Philips 432.182 NE

Dario Moreno — from the 1957 EP Imploration, Philips 432.182 NE

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1975 Feelings-Morris Albert (LP) RCA Victor APL1-1018-d20

Feelings (m. Louis Gasté, Morris Albert, w. Morris Albert)

Morris Albert

Feelings — issued in 1974 on the single RCA Victor PB-10279, b/w “This World Today is a Mess” — US chart success: #6, Hot 100; #2, Adult Contemporary; also later released on the 1975 LP Feelings, RCA Victor ‎APL1-1018

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1974 Sentimientos-Morris Albert-(Brazil) Beverly 45-13.508

Sentimientos (aka “Dime”) — issued in 1974 on Beverly ‎(Brazil) 45-13.508; songwriting credited solely to Morris Albert on the label — A recording under the same title released by Mexican singer José José in 1974 has a different lyric.

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