And buttercups come peeping through the snow

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Howdy folks. Today I published a page on the song “When You’ve Got a Little Springtime in Your Heart,” which was written, words and music, by Harry Woods. The song was copyrighted on 28 December 1933 and introduced by Jessie Matthews in the musical film Evergreen, which was released in April 1934 in the UK, 31 December 1934 in the US, and in 1935 in other countries.

Seven of the following nine recordings are included in the page, which can be viewed here:

When You’ve Got a Little Springtime in Your Heart

early recordings:

  • 1934
    • Jessie Matthews with Orchestra conducted by Bretton Byrd
    • Bertini & The Tower Blackpool Dance Band, vocal: Maurice Elwin
    • Ray Noble and his Orchestra, vocal: Al Bowlly
    • Jack Payne and his Band, vocal: Jack Payne
    • Joe Loss and his Band, vocal: Harry Case
    • Roy Fox and his Band, vocal: Denny Dennis
  • 1934-1935
    • Geraldo and his Sweet Music, vocal: Cyril Grantham – (part of an “Evergreen” medley) issued c. 1934-1935
    • Billy Merrin and his Commanders, vocal: unidentified – issued in 1934 or 1935
    • Louis Levy and his Gaumont British Symphony, vocal: Janet Lind — part of a medley of movie music recorded on 10 September 1936

recent recording:

  • The Pasadena Roof Orchestra — 2013

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The other two recordings will be added when they become available. Here’s a more detailed list of the nine recordings that I’ve indentified:

  • Jessie Matthews with orchestra conducted by Bretton Byrd — issued on the 78 rpm single (UK) Columbia DB 1404, b/w “(a) Tinkle, Tinkle, Tinkle ; (b) Over My Shoulder”
  • Bertini and The Tower Blackpool Dance Band, vocal: Maurice Elwin — recorded in London on 22 May 1934 (matrix JW 1891-2); issued on the single (UK) Eclipse 750, c/w “Hot Punch” — “Bertini” was the stage name of the violin-playing, British dance band leader Bertram Harry Gutsell.

audio file from the British Dance Band sound files at Mike Thomas’ website (mgthomas.co.uk):

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  • Ray Noble and his Orchestra, vocal: Al Bowlly — recorded on 2 July 1934; issued in the UK on the 78 rpm single HMV B.6504, and in the US on the single Victor 24720, c/w “Over My Shoulder” (Harry Woods) in each case
  • Jack Payne and his Band, vocal: Jack Payne — recorded in April 1934 or July 1934; issued on the 78 rpm single (UK) Rex 8227, b/w “Over My Shoulder”
  • Joe Loss and his Band, featuring Chick Henderson, vocal: Harry Case — recorded in London on 31 August 1934; issued on (UK) Regal Zonophone MR 1417, c/w “Over My Shoulder” — available on various compilations including the 1982 two-disc LP Hits Of The Thirties
  • Roy Fox and his Band, vocal: Denny Dennis — issued in 1934 in the US on the 78 rpm single Decca 275, as the B-side of “Over My Shoulder”
  • Geraldo and his Sweet Music, vocal: Cyril Grantham — part of an “Evergreen” medley issued c. 1934-1935 on the singles (UK) Columbia DB 1408, and (US) Columbia 3007-D

  • Billy Merrin and his Commanders, with unidentified vocalist — recording date unknown (British Homophone Company matrix S-3919); issued in 1934 or 1935 on the single (UK) Sterno 1474, c/w “Over My Shoulder” — also issued in 1934 or 1935 on the single (UK) Plaza P-305, under the pseudonym Al Gold and his Band — Credited to Billy Merrin & His Commanders, the recording is also available on the 2012 Amazon digital album Just a Crazy Song.

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  • Louis Levy and his Gaumont British Symphony, vocal: Janet Lind — part of a medley of movie music recorded on 10 September 1936; issued on the single (UK) Columbia FB 1545 on side 1: “Music From The Movies–Medley, Part 1,”  b/w “Music From The Movies–Medley, Part 2”
  • The Pasadena Roof Orchestra — from the 2013 album Ladies And Gentleman, (Germany) Herzog Records 901038 HER

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sources:

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A summer night’s magic, enthralling me so

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Howdy. This post serves is to announce the expansion of the previously published feature Under a Blanket of Blue. I’ve added a dozen recordings over the past couple of days, plus a list of of the 32 recordings included in the page, and made it into a three part feature. Here are links to the three parts (or pages) of the feature:

Each page of the feature has links to all three pages. Recordings included in the feature still cover the time span 1933-1963, as they did before these additions. I may eventually add some more recent recordings.

1933-Under-a-Blanket-of-Blue-Glen-Gray-1

Under a Blanket of Blue (m. Jerry Livingston*, w. Al J. Neiburg and Marty Symes) — 1933 standard

Recordings added to the page yesterday and today:

  • The Southern Sisters — recorded in London on 10 October 1933; issued on the single (UK) Decca F.3690, c/w “Sentimental Gentleman from Georgia”
  • Paramount 6247 piano roll, played by Larry Arden — 1933
  • Maxine Gray with orchestra directed by David Rose — radio transcription; from the 27 June 1940 episode of the California Melodies program (see Old Time Radio Downloads, Old Time Radio Catalog OTRCAT.com)
  • Glenn Miller and his Orchestra — from the 19 December 1940 episode of the Chesterfield Cigarettes “Moonlight Serenade” radio series
  • Barry Wood and The Melody Maids, with orchestra directed by Henry Sylvern — radio transcription; from, according to the video provider, a 1946 episode of The Barry Wood Show
  • Benny Goodman Sextet – recorded in New York on 30 July 1952; released on the 1954 album The New Benny Goodman Sextet, Columbia CL 552 — session personnel: Benny Goodman (cl), Terry Gibbs (vib), Teddy Wilson (p), Mundell Lowe (g), Sid Weiss (b), Don Lamond (d)
  • Art Tatum – Benny Carter – Louis Bellson — recorded on 25 June 1954 in Los Angeles, CA; originally released on the 1958 album Makin’ Whoopee, Verve Records MG V-8227
  • Billy Tipton Trio — from the 1955 album Sweet Georgia Brown, Tops L1522
  • Jane Froman — from the 1957 album Songs At Sunset, Capitol Records T889/T-889; also included on the 1957 EP Songs At Sunset, Part 2, Capitol EAP 2-889
  • Doris Day — from her 1957 LP Day By Night, Columbia CL 1053

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* credited under his birth name, Jerry Levinson

The world over was blue clover

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Late Saturday night (28 April) I published a page on the song “One Morning in May,” with music by Hoagy Carmichael and words by Mitchell Parish. Here’s a link to the new page:

One Morning in May

Links to the page have been added to the following relevant page indexes:

The first recording of “One Morning in May” that I’m aware of is that by Hoagy Carmichael and his Orchestra in Chicago in October 1933, an instrumental recording. Lanny Ross recorded the song in November 1933, possibly the first vocal recording, with accompaniment by an orchestra directed by Ray Sinatra. The Ross recording and a January 1934 recording by Emil Coleman and his Palais Royal Orchestra each feature a verse section that I haven’t heard in any other recordings of the song. A 16 November 1933 instrumental recording by Wayne King and his Orchestra was issued on (US) Brunswick 6735, c/w “Song of Surrender.”

In 1934 it was recorded by numerous bands and orchestras, including those led by the following: Emil Coleman, Harry Roy, Roy Fox, Ray Noble (with vocal by Al Bowlly), Bert Ambrose, Jack Payne, and Geraldo (Gerald Walcan Bright), and by Marion Harris with an orchestra that I haven’t yet identified. These were all vocal versions. The list suggests that the song may have been more popular in the UK than in the US early on. I’ve omitted videos or audio files of all of the early vocal recordings, mainly because I find it an ordeal to listen to them. I try to explain why in the page. I’ve yet discover any recordings of the song made during the years 1935-1951.

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  • Hoagy Carmichael and his Orchestra — recorded in Chicago on 10 October 1933; issued on the 78 rpm single Victor 24505, b/w “Armful Of Trouble,” B-side recorded by Don Bestor and his Orchestra

personnel (according to sources 12, 3):
Hoagy Carmichael – piano, Elvan ” Fuzzy” Combs (as J. Coombs) — alto sax,  Fred Murray – trumpet, Bob Vollmer* – drums, unknown – clarinet, unknown – guitar, unknown – bass

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  • Robert Farnon and his Orchestra — recorded on 26 June 1952; released in March 1953 on the LP Victor Schertzinger Suite / Hoagy Carmichael Suite, Decca Records LK 4055, (US) London Records LL 623
  • The Murray Arnold Quartet — from the 1956 album Overheard in a Cocktail Lounge, MGM Records E3457
  • The Octet of Max Albright — from the album Mood for Max, Motif Records ML502, release date unknown; album recorded in Los Angeles, CA, on 8, 16, and 23 November 1956 — also released on the album A Swingin’ Gig, Tampa Records TP 2 (color vinyl, 1957; black vinyl, 1958) — among members of the octet/session personnel are: Max Albright – drums, vibes, bells; Buddy Collette – alto sax, tenor sax, clarinet, flute; Gerald Wiggins –  piano
  • Buddy Cole — theater pipe organ solo, from his 1957 LP Pipes, Pedals and Fidelity, (US) Columbia CL 1003 (Mono), and (US, Canada) Columbia CS 8065
  • George Shearing Quintet and Orchestra — from the 1957 album Black Satin, (US) Capitol Records T858 and Capitol T-858 (Mono), (UK) Capitol T 858 (Mono) — According to Discogs.com, stereo versions of the album weren’t released until 1959.
  • Benny Carter — from his 1959 album Aspects, (US) United Artists Records UAL 4017 (Mono), UAS 5017 (Stereo) — instrumentation on this track: Benny Carter – alto & tenor saxophone, Joe Comfort – bass, Shelly Manne – drums, Bobby Gibbons – guitar, Arnold Ross – piano, as well as two other tenor saxes, and a horn section including five trumpets and two trombones

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  • Pete Jolly Trio — from the 1965 album Too Much, Baby!, Columbia CL 2397 (Mono), CS 9197 (Stereo) — Pete Jolly – piano, Chuck Berghoffer – bass, Nicholas Martinis – drums
  • Frankie Randall — from the 1965 album Sings & Swings, RCA Victor LPM-2967
  • Art Van Damme Quintet — from the 1967 LP The Gentle Art of Art, (Germany) SABA SB 15 114 ST; also issued in the UK in 1968 on Polydor 583 713
  • Bert Kaempfert — from the 1969 album One Lonely Night, (Germany, UK) Polydor 184 313
  • Carrie Smith with the Loonis McGlohon Trio — recorded in Columbia, SC, in November 1976; released in 1994 on the album Fine & Mellow, Audiophile ACD-164
  • Jim Callum Jazz Band — from the 1990 CD album Hooray for Hoagy!, Audiophile Records ACD-251
  • Barbara Lea, Bob Dorough, Dick Sudhalter and others — from the 1994 album “Hoagy’s Children” In a Celebration of Hoagy Carmichael’s Songs, Volume One, Audiophile ACD-291 — The album is a partly a reissue of the 1983 album Hoagy’s Children – Songs Of Hoagy Carmichael, Audiophile AP-165, but it’s augmented by several more recently recorded tracks. This track was recorded at Seltzer Sound in New York on 17 June 1993.
  • Bill Charlap Trio —  from the album Stardust, Blue Note 7243 5 35985 2 5 (also Blue Note 35985); album recorded 6-8 September 2001 at The Hit Factory in NYC, and released in 2002 — Bill Charlap – piano, Peter Washington – bass, Kenny Washington – drums
  • Paul Kuhn Trio — live performance, from the CD album Unforgettable Golden Jazz Classics, IN+OUT 77050 — According to the site jazzlists.com, the album was released in 2002. However there is certainly no consensus upon that date. Among other release dates for the album claimed by merchants and discographers are 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014, and 2016.
  • Randy Carmichael — piano solo, published on YouTube, 4 July 2008 — The performer is the second son of Hoagy Carmichael. The video provider says: “After dinner, Randy Carmichael graciously performed at the home of Ed and Judy Thornberg in Richmond, Indiana.”
  • Herbie Steward, Gene DiNovi, Dave Young, Yukio Kimura — from the LP One Morning in May, (Japan) Marshmallow Export MMEX-118LP, released on 21 January 2008
  • trio, featuring 二村希一(piano), 加藤泉(guitar), 横山裕(bass) — 10 November 2011, Tokyo

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Some early vocal recordings, not included in the page:

  • Lanny Ross with orchestra directed by Ray Sinatra – recorded on 27 November 1933; issued on Victor 24493, c/w “The Harbor of Home Sweet Home.”
  • Emil Coleman and his Palais Royal Orchestra, vocal: Jerry Cooper — recorded in New York, New York on 11 January 1934; issued on Columbia 2877-D, c/w “On the Wrong Side of the Fence” — In the UK the same two sides were issued on Regal Zonophone MR 1282, under the name “The Broadway Bandits.”
  • Harry Roy and his Orchestra (from the May Fair Hotel), w/ vocal refrain — recorded on 20 March 1934; issued in May 1934 on (UK) Parlophone R1812, c/w “Mama Don’t Want No Peas an’ Rice an’ Cocoanut Oil”
  • Roy Fox and his Band, vocal: Denny Dennis — recorded on 26 March 1934; issued on (UK) Decca F3943 (F.3943). c/w “You Oughta Be in Pictures”
  • Jack Payne and his Band, vocal: Billy Scott-Coomber — recorded in March 1934, according to RateYourMusic.com, and released in May 1934, according to 78rpmcommunity.com, on (UK) Rex 8147, c/w “Let’s Fall in Love”
  • Ray Noble and his Orchestra, vocal: Al Bowlly — recorded on 5 April 1934, (HMV)
  • Marion Harris with unidentified orchestral accompaniment – issued in April 1934 on (UK) Decca F.3954, b/w “Oo-oo-ooh! Honey (What You Do to Me)”
  • Geraldo and his Sweet Music, with unidentified vocalist —  1934 Pathetone short film, identified at britishpathe.com as film ID#1096.14. The original is or was evidently part of the contents of canister PT 216.

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* However, according to the book  Stardust Melody: The Life and Music of Hoagy Carmichael, (2009), Richard M. Sudhalter, p. 159, the drummer was Andy Van Sickle.

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